@READ KINDLE Ï Teatro: Il gabbiano - Zio Vanja - Tre sorelle - Il giardino dei ciliegi ò eBook or E-pub free

I only read The Seagull this time around Have read The Cherry Orchard and Uncle Vanya previously Will have to get to Three Sisters another day.One thing I liked was that this was an up to date American translation No musty period pieces here This helped bring out the farcial aspects of the play After all, Chekhov himself called it A Comedy in Four Acts Plus, The Seagull contains part of a play within the play, which is very easy to mock.Overall, not as strong as his later wor I only read The Seagull this time around Have read The Cherry Orchard and Uncle Vanya previously Will have to get to Three Sisters another day.One thing I liked was that this was an up to date American translation No musty period pieces here This helped bring out the farcial aspects of the play After all, Chekhov himself called it A Comedy in Four Acts Plus, The Seagull contains part of a play within the play, which is very easy to mock.Overall, not as strong as his later works no surprise there but he was already deft with characterization If you ve read other stuff by Chekhov and enjoyed it, I d recommend it If you re new to him, it might be better to start with Uncle Vanya or some of the short stories While a few of these pieces in this collection are duds, Chekhov still holds some weight despite being an overrated dead rich white male playwright I like the very contradiction of his comedies, that they carrydramatic weight than initially expected They re very much ensemble pieces, giving spotlights to each character despite their own apathy towards everyone around them They make you laugh, ruminate, and connect everything back to you despite their settings, and I think that s the poi While a few of these pieces in this collection are duds, Chekhov still holds some weight despite being an overrated dead rich white male playwright I like the very contradiction of his comedies, that they carrydramatic weight than initially expected They re very much ensemble pieces, giving spotlights to each character despite their own apathy towards everyone around them They make you laugh, ruminate, and connect everything back to you despite their settings, and I think that s the point of it all It comes together in the end, even if the characters are unlikable rich fools most of the time They re still human The Seagull 2 out of 5 stars I was once again reminded by Chekhov s twisted sense of humor while reading this play He finds humor in a person s tragedy, and while it worked in Uncle Vanya and The Cherry Orchard, it didn t for me in this play The characters seemed to be running around in circles with no focus, and the two year time skip was an interesting choice However, I could see what he was doing by the heartbreaking fourth act sometimes we shoot for dreams in the hopes we ll get the success we see everyone else experiencing, but it s not the fame that matters it s the perseverance through gaining that fame Doesn t mean it ll restore us, though it ends up destroying us instead Too bad I waded through three acts to get to that thematic showcase I wasn t really invested in much of this play until that moment Looks like I ll watch the film where Saiorse Ronan is Nina to see if it can be adapted well update TK Uncle Vanya 4 out of 5 stars I was in a production of The Cherry Orchard this past fall at my college, and I watched the 43rd Street movie adaptation of it prior to reading this for Directing class I m that person who despite recognizing Chekhov as a perhaps outdated and archaic historical playwright, I find his dramatic comedies funny and melodramatic, which I think is the point This story of country life going down the drain as these miserable people flourish on this estate with unrequited crushes and poor self esteems was fun and entertaining, especially with a guy with a nickname as amazing as Waffles The Three Sisters 1 out of 5 stars This flew over my head completely Who were these people wandering around and talking Why were they wallowing in their grief and intelligence and humor IDK I just didn t understand what I read and what I skimmed and felt completely detached The Cherry Orchard 4 out of 5 stars I played Yasha in this show at my college I was cast after the original actor declined the role, but you know what It do be like that sometimes , so I have a little bit of a personal attachment to this piece I wish some of the plot threads that did get closed ended up beingapparent than what they were, but for the most part, this is an absolutely heartbreaking comedy centered on the shift of the upper class to middle At the center is a family too privileged to care, but once they crack, everything comes crashing down Add in side romances, deception, and the classic pretending everything is fine act that no one buys, Chekhov is able to find humor in the fragility of these human beings and make it funny and sad at the same time A truly great piece, complete with the ending that doesn t hold back any punches @READ KINDLE Þ Teatro: Il gabbiano - Zio Vanja - Tre sorelle - Il giardino dei ciliegi ð Una rassegnazione disperata, il rimpianto del passato, la vanit dell attesa, nei quattro capolavori di Cechov commedie distaccate, di pura conversazione, che segnano l inizio del teatro contemporaneo La secrétaire il rimpianto del passato Bases d'optique géométrique : Des instruments ardents à la formation des images pour comprendre la vision et les couleurs de l'arc-en-ciel la vanit dell attesa The Square nei quattro capolavori di Cechov commedie distaccate La Discipline positive dans la classe di pura conversazione When Stars Came Down To Earth: Cosmology Of The Skidi Pawnee Indians Of North America che segnano l inizio del teatro contemporaneo Side by side comparison of an early monologue in The Three Sisters from Senelick and Rocamora no spoilers , plus a few additional lines that stood out to me when I was reading both translations side by side also selected from early in the play, so no spoilers TL DR Neither edition was perfect I ended up borrowing pieces of both translations to put together a natural sounding monologue for a class Slightly prefer Rocamora for performing or studying, but the Senelick is slightlyacces Side by side comparison of an early monologue in The Three Sisters from Senelick and Rocamora no spoilers , plus a few additional lines that stood out to me when I was reading both translations side by side also selected from early in the play, so no spoilers TL DR Neither edition was perfect I ended up borrowing pieces of both translations to put together a natural sounding monologue for a class Slightly prefer Rocamora for performing or studying, but the Senelick is slightlyaccessible ROCAMORAWhen I woke up this morning, I got up, I bathed, and suddenly it seemed that everything on earth was now clear to me, and I knew how I must live Darling Ivan Romanich, I understand everything now A man must work, he must work by the sweat of his brow, whoever he may be, and this and this alone is his reason for his being, his happiness, his ecstasy How noble it is to be a humble workman, who rises at the break of dawn and smashes stones by the roadside, or a shepherd, or an engine driver on the railroadMerciful God, let alone a human being, better to be an ox, a humble horse, even, if only to work, better than than a young lady, who gets up at noon each day, who drinks coffee in bed, who takes two hours to get dressedoh, how awful it is The way one thirsts for water on a sweltering day, so do I thirst for work And if I don t rise early each day and work, then deny me thy friendship, Ivan Romanich SENELICKWhen I woke up today, I got out of bed and washed, and suddenly it dawned on me that I understand everything in the world and I know how a person out to live Dear Ivan Romanych, I know everything A person has to work hard, work by the sweat of his brow, no matter who he is, and that s the only thing that gives meaning and purpose to his life, his happiness, his moments of ecstasy Wouldn t it be great to be a manual laborer who gets up while it s still dark out and breaks stones on the road, or a shepherd, or a schoolteacher, or an engineer on the railroadMy God, what s the point of being human You might as well be an ox, an ordinary horse, so long as you re working, rather than a young woman who gets up a t noon, has her coffee in bed, and takes two hours to dressoh, isn t that awful Sometimes when the weather s sultry, the way you long for a drink well, that s the way I long for work And if I don t get up early and work hard, stop being my friend, Ivan Romanych In my opinion as a shoddy Russian translator and an excellent English speaker, Rocamora s that everything on earth was now clear to me is a closer and nicer sounding translation of Chekhov s than Senelick s I understand everything in the world, which sounds awkwardly pompous and doesn t have the excuse of being literal Rocamora s phrasing preserves some of Chekhov s poetic rhythm in this line, and thereby also conveys something about Irina the content of her speech is undeniably self important, but she s also idealistic, romantic, and naive By leaving out this meta information we can glean from word choice, Senelick leaves out some information about Irina, too For the same reason, Rocamora s slightly flowerly deny me thy friendship, Ivan Romanich makes sense to me it s aliteral translation of the way Chekhov wrote and even though it doesn t translate perfectly naturally into modern speech, the slightly dramatic, grandiloquent touch to a phrase like, deny me thy friendship adds to our understanding of Irina s character as an idealistic, highbrow girl with a bit of superiority complex though perhaps unnecessarily preserving the Russian thy thine difference that s now extinct in English I don t really like Rocamora s merciful God try saying that out loud in a natural way when My God would have sufficed for , and I don t think her let alone a human being is as clear as Senelick s, what s the point As a devotee ofliteral translations preserving participles, poetics, etc , I do think that sometimes Senelick s translation aids the overall intelligibility of a text For example, later in this scene Senelick s translation of Olga s line, How dreadfully inappropriate isfitting than Rocamora s How perfectly awful when Chebutykin gifts Irina a samovar Senelick s edition includes a helpful note that a samovar is usually an anniversary gift from husband to wife without including this background information in an actual play, inappropriate hints at the nature of this transgressionclearly than awful does Yes, Rocamora s is aliteral translation of , and inappropriate is a milder word choice, but Senelick s slightly interpretative leap here is a one word way to help the audience appreciate the overall meaning, even without knowing why the samovar is so offensive to Olga Overall, Senelick s strength is in the natural flow is his translation, but sometimes he veers into being almost too casual His wouldn t it be great to be sounds really cheesy to me, and it seems like Rocamora s how noble communicates the idea better As an amateur, I would be inclined to translate as Senelick did as literally as possible , but to the best of my knowledge Rocamora s noble is perfectly adequate Something about wouldn t it be great just doesn t sound right to me I would go for, wouldn t it be noble to be Irina isn t suggesting she will actually be pursuing a career in manual labor or that it s something she d really enjoy doing she s an upperclass girl romanticizing the humble worker in the way we often romanticize the noble poor or the noble savage This is borderline way too subjective dig into a single line, so take it as you will So, from a few lines, this seems like an almost futile analysis sometimes Senelick is clearer, sometimes it s Rocamora You would have to do a line by line breakdown of an entire play to get a real sense of who is the overall better translator, and not just 14 lines from a single play in a large compilation And in all fairness, there are moments where neither translator really captures the moment some of Solyony s lines are difficult although I appreciate that Rocamora captures their rhythm if not always their meaning However, the reason I prefer Rocamora s translation is this tiny, tiny moment At the end of a small speech different monologue , Chekhov has Solyony semi ironically address Tusenbach as , which Senelick translates as angel mine whereas Rocamora goes with my angel This kind of construction the possessive following the noun is OK in Russian , but have you ever heard someone say that in English in your life That s the sort of decision to discuss in a literary class with a teacher who knows some Russian, not great for performing a play And that, in my opinion, is the problem with Senelick One of his real strengths is the overall clarity of his translation it reads so easily and the language is so natural that sometimes in my opinion Senelick sacrifices literality where it would be useful for interpretation It s a clumsy balance between being sometimes too literal angel mine to perform and sometimes too loose for a serious academic interpretation, or even a serious theatrical interpretation To its merit, the Senelick edition does come with some very nice notes, essays and letters that make the playintelligible, which is enormously helpful, both for a class or a role I would recommend checking out or even owning a copy of the Senelick for this reason alone I m probably going to end up owning two or three copies of these plays, but if you are looking for an easy introduction to Chekhov, I would go with the Senelick Here s onelittle note In the opening monologue of the play Rocamora has Olga say to Irina, you re all in white, which is a fine translation of but it doesn t communicate the significance of her dress as clearly as Senelick s you re back to wearing white, reminding us that the sisters would have been wearing dark mourning clothes for a while after their father s death The play is filled with moments like this, where Senelick will add in just a little line or word that made me go, Oh, so that s what this means The difference in intelligibility is small really, the wearing white thing is clear enough if you think about it , but if you want something immediately intelligible to amateurs, to students, to an audience Senelick has a lot to offer If I weren t such a stickler for translation, I would make Senelick my reading for pleasure edition.Hoping to get my hands on a translation by Frayn as well A Russian doorman told me that in a certain context, it emphasizes sentiment, like mom my, conveys a certain affection for your mom Don t quote me on that If modern theatre is considered an intellectual pastime not fit for the consumption of the casual viewer, then Tch khov s plays strike at the heart of drama s subtetlies And rightly so for the plays, filled with undersayings, carve a complex structure out of the amalgam of thoughts and feelings that litter the human psyche.It would be unfair, though, to describe the pieces as an unintelligible rant In fact, the plots and characters are robust and strongly developed and despite the apparent may If modern theatre is considered an intellectual pastime not fit for the consumption of the casual viewer, then Tch khov s plays strike at the heart of drama s subtetlies And rightly so for the plays, filled with undersayings, carve a complex structure out of the amalgam of thoughts and feelings that litter the human psyche.It would be unfair, though, to describe the pieces as an unintelligible rant In fact, the plots and characters are robust and strongly developed and despite the apparent mayhem of an histrionic burgoise there is a very fine message that s never openly uttered but which lingers in the air and, as if poetic mist, hazes the dramatic landscape before settling on the heart of the reader.Perhaps what struck me the most is Tch khov s insistence on the otiosity inherent to the country life, described as a sort of malingering miasma which clouds the human drive and sucks even the steadfast into a state of idleness and bestiality poles apart from the city life, the vanguard of knowledge, reason and achievement a perspective curiously contrary to Tolstoy s worldview and ascetic preferences, to whom Tch khov was contemporary.Despite the regret filled thoughts that the characters have or acquire throughout the plays, I feel there reads a text other than the prophecy for the dark doom of humanity a beacon, hiding among the words, lighting the path and calling the reader to embrace the rational him, the only tool fit for crossing the dark waters of sloth and reach the greatness to which he is bound I had an audition for Cherry Orchard so I thought I would read all four major plays to check off Chekhov from my list I liked these a lot better than I thought I would, but this is partly because I had tried to read them before in a different translation and just couldn t maintain interest These are pretty new translations by Carol Rocamora and they read pretty well I felt like I could understand what was happening a little better, and the humor came outI think I like Uncle Vanya t I had an audition for Cherry Orchard so I thought I would read all four major plays to check off Chekhov from my list I liked these a lot better than I thought I would, but this is partly because I had tried to read them before in a different translation and just couldn t maintain interest These are pretty new translations by Carol Rocamora and they read pretty well I felt like I could understand what was happening a little better, and the humor came outI think I like Uncle Vanya the best, and Three Sisters the least, but they are all pretty good One thing I don t really understand is why he gets through these plays with a lot of realism and wit, and then always manages to tack a long we will endure we will live through WORK speech at the end of each play Those speeches seem thrown in It s also funny that people are always saying awkward expository things at the start of these plays People will say things like, look sisters, THEREthere is where mama diedmamotchkaright there, in the corner, while chastising Nanny.do you remember, do you remember how we cried I think they probably remember The other thing about these plays is that they always refer to characters in about a hundred different ways, and it s hard to keep up Someone will mention Vatiky Vatikovitch in act III and I m like, who the hell is Vatiky Vatikovitch, so I look in the character list, and it says that Vatikovitch is Popov, a local lieutenant, who has been in the play from the start And then the next sentence they are calling him Popotchka or Popseyvitch or something Did everyone in 1900 era Russia have local lieutenants and barons I wonder if people watching this then would be laughing and saying It s so true He s just like MY local lieutenant Chekhov is a master.Carol Rocamora rocks I had her as a professor twice She is so extraordinarily passionate about Russian literature that she seemed to become 30 40 years younger while teachingand when she talked about Checkhov s dacha, I was able to see it.The only thing I don t like about this translation is that though Carol retains Chekhov s poetry, her translation is a little too American colloquial at times If I spoke Russian, I could explain this in detail, but as my only claim Chekhov is a master.Carol Rocamora rocks I had her as a professor twice She is so extraordinarily passionate about Russian literature that she seemed to become 30 40 years younger while teachingand when she talked about Checkhov s dacha, I was able to see it.The only thing I don t like about this translation is that though Carol retains Chekhov s poetry, her translation is a little too American colloquial at times If I spoke Russian, I could explain this in detail, but as my only claim to being Russian is my deceased great grandparents, I am just left with the genetic coding feeling of being Russian, and visceral sensation of being able to quickly judge an authentic or not authentic Russian translation.Like any author translated often, I would compare the versions of different plays Example Carol s translation of The Seagull is better than Laurence Selenick s translation of The Seagull However, Laurence Selenick s translation of Uncle Vanya is better than Carol s translation of Uncle Vanya I find it difficult to read certain classics Some books cast such a large shadow over literature that one s already encountered it somewhere else It can leave the original tame in comparison Chekhov has been inspirational with his realistic style as well as thewell known Chekhov s Gun I think I remember countless movies ominously introducing a weapon of some sort and obviously telegraphing its use later on It all comes from Chekhov These are plays about loss and regret and also a gre I find it difficult to read certain classics Some books cast such a large shadow over literature that one s already encountered it somewhere else It can leave the original tame in comparison Chekhov has been inspirational with his realistic style as well as thewell known Chekhov s Gun I think I remember countless movies ominously introducing a weapon of some sort and obviously telegraphing its use later on It all comes from Chekhov These are plays about loss and regret and also a great deal of gun violence I can see why the Chekhov s Gun reference has permeated so much storytelling The gun is a solution for some of these character s regret but causes so manyproblems for the characters in his plays.I really loved the Seagull for its Lear like love I love you as the Sea Gull loves the lake I will never look at a seagull the same way It also seemed ahead of its time for its play within a play format talking about a post apocalyptic landscape that could be used to focus on environmental issues today It was further poetic about the moon rise over a dead planet The ending is tragic and a straightforward permanent solution to love lost.Uncle Vanya and the Three Sisters blended together a bit for me There were insightful and funny, but also tragic lines Here it is not even love lost, but never fully gained The end of Uncle Vanya is probably the saddest I have ever read Essentially, the miserable characters will go on being miserable for the rest of their days until they meet a grateful death Then, perhaps, God will see them and their misery It was a little melodramatic for me The three sisters had a similar feel and ending More of a tone of revenge at the end, but equal parts tragic.The Cherry Orchard is certainly the most famous play in this book This one was tricky for me as the overall theme is the loss of a beautiful aristocratic home and orchard and all the memories that go with it It is a lament of what was lost I saw acommunist perspective that crept in when I read it Why shouldn tpeople be able to enjoy the same place Certainly, the loss of the orchard is needlessly tragic as we hear it being chopped down at the end of the play However, one could also view it as the worker getting revenge against his uncaring aristocratic master The same kind of theme that appears in The Three Sisters This seems like some sort of precursor for the Soviet Union that would dominate Russia soon after the play Or perhaps recently reading A Gentleman in Moscow could have influenced my Reading One can easily see the input of the classics and good minimalist writing technique We know about Chekhov s Gun don t introduce something that you won t use later Even Chekhov s last words before his death, It s a long time since I drank champagne would be immortalized in a Raymond Carver short story Errand and a Tom Waits song.I was very excited to find this book at a Friends book sale to add to my ever groaning bookshelf It makes me want to recite the ode to the bookshelf from The Cherry Orchard Dear, honored bookcase, I salute thy existence, which for over one hundred years has served the glorious ideals of goodness and justice thy silent appeal to fruitful endeavor, unflagging in the course of a hundred years, tearfully sustaining through generations of our family, courage, and faith in a better future, and fostering in us ideals of goodness and social consciousness Favorite Passages When one has no real life, one lives on illusions It s better than nothing 91Voinitsky Well, I m insane, I m not responsible, I have a right to say silly things.Astrov That s a stale trick You re not insane, you re just a crackpot A clown There was a time when I regarded every crackpot as sick, abnormal but now I am of the opinion that it s the normal state of man to be a crackpot You re perfectly normal.P118It seems to me a man must have some faith or must seek a faith, otherwise, his life is empty, emptyTo live and not know why the cranes fly, why children are born, why there are stars in the skyEither one knows what one lives for, or it s all futile, worthless P162Happiness is something we never have, but only long for P164Dear, honored bookcase, I salute thy existence, which for over one hundred years has served the glorious ideals of goodness and justice thy silent appeal to fruitful endeavor, unflagging in the course of a hundred years, tearfully sustaining through generations of our family, courage, and faith in a better future, and fostering in us ideals of goodness and social consciousness P233 December of Drama 2015, days 28 31Let s tackle these one by one.Seagull You feared a lonely deathLike a lake leaves you alone in her depths bodyache, by Purity RingSo a lot of admirers of Chekhov praise him for his success in direct and honest drama, and his instigation of a new era or new forms in drama, and I d agree with all that But I think what s lost in the conversation is the content, the ideas he incorporated in the plays themselves There is a personally resonant kind of pessimi December of Drama 2015, days 28 31Let s tackle these one by one.Seagull You feared a lonely deathLike a lake leaves you alone in her depths bodyache, by Purity RingSo a lot of admirers of Chekhov praise him for his success in direct and honest drama, and his instigation of a new era or new forms in drama, and I d agree with all that But I think what s lost in the conversation is the content, the ideas he incorporated in the plays themselves There is a personally resonant kind of pessimism that lurks between the lines, or comes right out in the open, and yes he probably owed a lot of this to Schopenhauer but all the same it seems to have been proved out by time In some lines see Cherry Orchard, below he seems to bemoan the destruction of the environment, but in others he seems to long for the day when life has been extirpated from the earth and silence reigns Hear, hear.Uncle Vanya I feel guilty being aliveWhile so many beautiful people have diedI never thought that we wouldn t rule the worldI always think we will I keep my fist clenched still Confetti, by Cold CaveIn Seagull, you have the case of Chekhov s Gun being used to successfully end a life Here, it just goes off, and the person apparently misses And as the introduction attributes a quote to a Russian director Uncle Vanya is an American play, because you have a family gathering for the holidays, bickering, a gunshot, then everyone going offor less reconciled It also follows a pattern that emerges in these four major plays, in that some kind of violence punctuates the drama in the final act This isn t revolutionary of course, and I know that some others call Chekhov s stuff boring or depressing, but if you know what to look for there s a definite tension the whole time, steadily rising until the climax I happen to really enjoy his plays, I ve discovered their style, structure, and content.Three Sisters Home, is where I want to beBut I guess I m already there This Must Be the Place Naive Melody , by Talking HeadsOlga, Masha and Irina There, see, I can name them Aside from that, this play didn t leave too much of an impression, although I could recognize that the violent climax pattern repeated in the form of an out of control fire, and also a duel that kills off a potential suitor, who was going to sweep one of the sisters away and provide some direction to her life All of the sisters seem to be struggling with that, an aimlessness or insecurity about their choices.Cherry Orchard Don t look ahead, there s stormy weatherAnother roadblock in our wayBut if we go, we go togetherOur hands are tied here if we stay Disparate Youth, by SantigoldThis one affects me the most I m fairly sure I read it before, because the revelation and the resolution at the end seemed very familiar I can picture Russian audiences in tears at the end, because even I come close to that It dramatizes a pain we ve all experienced, and captures perfectly both the dread and joy in letting go of something In other words, it s really about the power of time, its dual capacity to destroy and renew Every day we are losing something we can never regain If the final act of this doesn t affect you, your heart is probably made of stone.Final thoughts Chekhov is great He created drama out of true to life moments, only to occasionally pull the veil and address those unspoken truths that lie beneath And this edition is brilliant, for the positioning of the plays themselves, as well as the notes I can t speak to the quality of the translation but I d recommend this volume to anyone into Russian literature These plays move me in a way which I can t describe Or, rather, I probably could but it would be endless and personal and boring.I think this is modern suburbia in embryo it is also, of course, seeped in The Russian Character I love Dostoevsky and Tolstoy with a deep passion but there s really no one quite like Chekhov For that thin tissue of humanity billowing in the wind over the void thing he s the one you want.How much life do we lose, in living How much have we lost already psLouie These plays move me in a way which I can t describe Or, rather, I probably could but it would be endless and personal and boring.I think this is modern suburbia in embryo it is also, of course, seeped in The Russian Character I love Dostoevsky and Tolstoy with a deep passion but there s really no one quite like Chekhov For that thin tissue of humanity billowing in the wind over the void thing he s the one you want.How much life do we lose, in living How much have we lost already psLouie Malle s final film Vanya on 42nd St is an autumnal masterpiece The actors are all veterans of stage and screen who meet every so often in a crumbling theater to put on the eponymous play for friends and relatives and they literally just walk in off the street and get into the stir of the play