!Read ♲ Hannibal: The Military Biography of Rome's Greatest Enemy ♭ PDF or E-pub free

!Read ♾ Hannibal: The Military Biography of Rome's Greatest Enemy ⚖ The Romans destruction of Carthage after the Third Punic War erased any Carthaginian historical record of Hannibal s life What we know of him comes exclusively from Roman historians who had every interest in minimizing his success, exaggerating his failures, and disparaging his character The charges leveled against Hannibal include greed, cruelty and atrocity, sexual indulgence, and even cannibalism But even these sources were forced to grudgingly admit to Hannibal s military genius, if only to make their eventual victory over him appear greaterYet there is no doubt that Hannibal was the greatest Carthaginian general of the Second Punic War When he did not defeat them outright, he fought to a standstill the best generals Rome produced, and he sustained his army in the field for sixteen long years without mutiny or desertion Hannibal was a first rate tactician, only a somewhat lesser strategist, and the greatest enemy Rome ever faced When he at last met defeat at the hands of the Roman general Scipio, it was against an experienced officer who had to strengthen and reconfigure the Roman legion and invent mobile tactics in order to succeed Even so, Scipio s victory at Zama was against an army that was a shadow of its former self The battle could easily have gone the other way If it had, the history of the West would have been changed in ways that can only be imagined Richard A Gabriel s brilliant new biography shows how Hannibal s genius nearly unseated the Roman Empire Mexican Immigration to the United States: A Study of Human Migration and Adjustment exaggerating his failures The Carnival of the Animals and disparaging his character The charges leveled against Hannibal include greed Izbrana proza cruelty and atrocity Third Mate (River Wolf Pack, sexual indulgence Third Mate and even cannibalism But even these sources were forced to grudgingly admit to Hannibal s military genius The Virtues of the Table: How to Eat and Think if only to make their eventual victory over him appear greaterYet there is no doubt that Hannibal was the greatest Carthaginian general of the Second Punic War When he did not defeat them outright Los enemigos íntimos de la democracia he fought to a standstill the best generals Rome produced Gamification In Human Resources and he sustained his army in the field for sixteen long years without mutiny or desertion Hannibal was a first rate tactician Gamification In Human Resources only a somewhat lesser strategist In Black and White: [The Story of an Open Transracial Adoption] and the greatest enemy Rome ever faced When he at last met defeat at the hands of the Roman general Scipio Will You Please Be Quiet, Please? it was against an experienced officer who had to strengthen and reconfigure the Roman legion and invent mobile tactics in order to succeed Even so A Primary Killing Scipio s victory at Zama was against an army that was a shadow of its former self The battle could easily have gone the other way If it had Babar & His Friends at the Farm the history of the West would have been changed in ways that can only be imagined Richard A Gabriel s brilliant new biography shows how Hannibal s genius nearly unseated the Roman Empire This volume is an excellent examination of the Carthaginian general, and genius Hannibal Barca Richard A Gabriel is thorough in his assessment, referencing his statements extensively to both primary ancient sources and secondary contemporary researchers It provides insight into Hannibal s childhood, his family, father and his Italian campaign An excellent overview of the life of an extraordinary man A superb book that describes Hannibal in great detail, who won all his battles except the n This volume is an excellent examination of the Carthaginian general, and genius Hannibal Barca Richard A Gabriel is thorough in his assessment, referencing his statements extensively to both primary ancient sources and secondary contemporary researchers It provides insight into Hannibal s childhood, his family, father and his Italian campaign An excellent overview of the life of an extraordinary man A superb book that describes Hannibal in great detail, who won all his battles except the next to last, Zama, and his last as a navel commander for King Prusias of Bithynia Hannibal was a field commander, not a navel commander and lost the war with Rome Why does the adage He who wins the battles, wins the war, not work for Hannibal in the Carthaginians Second Punic War against Rome On page 218 Hannibal failed because his operational victories did not achieve his strategic objectives After Cannae, the strategic ground shifted beneath his feet, reducing a man who had once been the king of the battlefield to littlethan a sacrificial pawn in a much larger game that he never really understood Also important is a footnote to Chapter 9 Why Hannibal Failed, from the text page 212, footnote 2 on page 248 in the text My old friend and colleague the late Col Harry Summers used to tell the story of his assignment to the negotiations in Hanoi between the North Vietnamese and the Americans in an effort to end the war In a conversation with a North Vietnamese colonel, Summers remarked, Well, whatever the outcome, you never defeated us on the battlefield The North Vietnamese colonel smiled and said, That is true But it is also irrelevant And so it was with Hannibal against the Romans, until the end at Zama and Scipio Africanus.A brilliant must read, if you re into history A genuinely enjoyable book Not too one sided which is unusual in biographies In fact the author is extremely critical of Hannibal at times, especially his inability to push home his advantage and attack Rome when it lay open to assault Given that most of the information comes from fairly biased Roman sources the author does a good job of sifting through the information and making valid points. I found the first 2 3 of this book to be exceptionally dry and I very much had trouble getting through it It reads just like a text book and can become dry and repetitive often The book s saving grace is when it FINALLY starts to describe the actual combat in Italy. Very dry reading Way too much info about logistics and too little about the actual battles It felt like 85% on logistics and quantities of equipment on only 15% dedicated to the actual battles More maps would have helped Even the famous crossing of the Alps was covered in short order Hannibal was famous for using elephants, yet the author gives very little info about how they were utilized in battle. Richard Gabriel has written a very useful, anddetailed than most, military history of one of the greatest commanders of antiquity Hannibal Barca Detailing the structure of Carthaginian society and how this impacted their structuring of their armed forces, and the role of the Barcid family in reforming and leading the impetus of Carthaginian military doctrine, Gabriel lays a firm foundation for the narrative that follows While the book covers well trodden ground, it is still relevatory a Richard Gabriel has written a very useful, anddetailed than most, military history of one of the greatest commanders of antiquity Hannibal Barca Detailing the structure of Carthaginian society and how this impacted their structuring of their armed forces, and the role of the Barcid family in reforming and leading the impetus of Carthaginian military doctrine, Gabriel lays a firm foundation for the narrative that follows While the book covers well trodden ground, it is still relevatory and deeply insightful Following the loss of territory in Sicily, and the Roman seizure of Corsica and Sardinia following the end of the First Punic War, Carthage turned to the Iberian peninsula to expand it s resource pool and it s strategic depth It was in the fighting against the various tribes and alliances in Iberia where Hannibal had his first tastes of commanding troops in the field The Spanish were excellent fighters and Hannibal felt no hesitation in absorbing them into the Carthaginian armed forces structure In his invasion of Italy, Spanish troops would be one of the main components of his war machine He even married a Spanish tribal princess to further cement alliances with Iberian tribes and Carthage Gabriel does a very good job of detailing and analyzing the very familiar story of Hannibal s initial invasion The Battles of the Ticinus River, Trebia, Lake Trasimene, and Cannae, all well known in military history circles, is bolstered by a refreshing detailing of Hannibal s war in Italy following his triumph at Cannae Most military histories even Goldsworthy s either gloss over, or entirely ignore the war in Italy post Cannae While true, despite his amazing triumph in destroying a 90,000 man Roman army at Cannae, the Romans turned around and forced Hannibal into a strategic irrelevancy, Gabriel shows the reader as to how and why this was done Something the vast majority of studies on Hannibal, and the Second Punic War, fail at Hannibal s return to Tunisia, to face Scipio at Zama is the most detailed engagement of the book, and Gabriel shows how much of a mess, for both commanders, that battle truly was Gabriel then writes a very good chapter analyzing why Hannibal ultimately failed His assertion that it was Hannibal s cultural Hellenism Carthage was not native to Africa, but a colony of Phoenician merchants native to Tyre, in modern day Lebanon, and who had close cultural ties to the Greeks and the Hellenic Empires is not exactly a new assertion While it has been made before, Gabriel does a better job than most of the others in detailing how Hannibal s Hellenistic mindset when conducting warfare, failed utterly to take into account the Roman cultural doctrine of total warfare Hannibal, seeking to defeat Rome not to conquer it as too many have in the past asserted , was predicated upon winning a series of stunning tactical successes to force the Roman Senate to the negotiating tables Roman doctrine was one of strategic endurance Individual tactical and operational failures were secondary to ultimate strategic success, and Rome eschewed negotiations in favor of attrition, and total mobilization and total modes of warfare In fact, this is the birth of the modern Western methodology of warfare Overall, there were very few errors or typos, all of which can ve attributed to the all too common malaise of sloppy editing and poor proofing that plagues most publishing houses now a days This is an excellent book, and my literary introduction to Mr Gabriel I was familiar with him as a young man when the History Channel aired the somewhat awful show Battles BC, where Gabriel was one of the three main talking heads After reading this work on Hannibal, I plan to seek outof his work Highly recommended