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READ PDF ç Empire Of The Clouds: When Britain's Aircraft Ruled The World Ü In , Britain was the world s leading designer and builder of aircraft a world class achievement that was not mere rhetoric And what aircraft they were The sleek Comet, the first jet airliner The awesome delta winged Vulcan, an intercontinental bomber that could be thrown about the sky like a fighter The Hawker Hunter, the most beautiful fighter jet ever built and the Lightning, which could zoom ten miles above the clouds in a couple of minutes and whose pilots rated flying it as better than sex How did Britain so lose the plot that today there is not a single aircraft manufacturer of any significance in the country And what was it like to be alive in that marvellous post war moment when innovative new British aircraft made their debut, and pilots were the rock stars of the age James Hamilton Paterson captures that season of glory in a compelling book that fuses his own memories of being a schoolboy plane spotter with a ruefully realistic history of British decline its loss of self confidence and power It is the story of great and charismatic machines and the men who flew them heroes such as Bill Waterton, Neville Duke, John Derry and Bill Beaumont who took inconceivable risks, so that we could fly without a second thought Fitness for Women Britain was the world s leading designer and builder of aircraft a world class achievement that was not mere rhetoric And what aircraft they were The sleek Comet Tomorrow Is Another Country the first jet airliner The awesome delta winged Vulcan Resurrected (Adam Wolf Thriller, an intercontinental bomber that could be thrown about the sky like a fighter The Hawker Hunter Dear Woman the most beautiful fighter jet ever built and the Lightning The MacKinnons Bride (The Highland Brides, which could zoom ten miles above the clouds in a couple of minutes and whose pilots rated flying it as better than sex How did Britain so lose the plot that today there is not a single aircraft manufacturer of any significance in the country And what was it like to be alive in that marvellous post war moment when innovative new British aircraft made their debut Donker leuens and pilots were the rock stars of the age James Hamilton Paterson captures that season of glory in a compelling book that fuses his own memories of being a schoolboy plane spotter with a ruefully realistic history of British decline its loss of self confidence and power It is the story of great and charismatic machines and the men who flew them heroes such as Bill Waterton Agnes Moors Wild Knight Neville Duke Somethings There John Derry and Bill Beaumont who took inconceivable risks Nag Van Die Tarentale so that we could fly without a second thought Interesting book about the rise and fall of the British aviation industry.What makes this rather sobering topic such a wonderful read is that it is written by an aircraft enthousiast The writer achieves to portray certain flying events described in the book in a lively and entertaining way Next to this he does give a disturbing view of what happened inside the industry which looked from the outside to be on an unstoppable ride.The balance between industry and sheer aviation action is just righ Interesting book about the rise and fall of the British aviation industry.What makes this rather sobering topic such a wonderful read is that it is written by an aircraft enthousiast The writer achieves to portray certain flying events described in the book in a lively and entertaining way Next to this he does give a disturbing view of what happened inside the industry which looked from the outside to be on an unstoppable ride.The balance between industry and sheer aviation action is just right Went through its pages like the wind.Well done I bought this book as I have a interest in the UK s ability to design, build and operate aircraft from the start of World War Two and beyond into the 1970s that is born from reading about or seeing these aircraft in museums and for some at airshows.What I read was a story about Meteors, Lightnings, Vampires, Canberras, and of course the V Bombers Valiant, Victor and the mighty Vulcan from concept to design to service Alongside this is the axed BAC TSR2 and Fairey FD2 and manythat showed I bought this book as I have a interest in the UK s ability to design, build and operate aircraft from the start of World War Two and beyond into the 1970s that is born from reading about or seeing these aircraft in museums and for some at airshows.What I read was a story about Meteors, Lightnings, Vampires, Canberras, and of course the V Bombers Valiant, Victor and the mighty Vulcan from concept to design to service Alongside this is the axed BAC TSR2 and Fairey FD2 and manythat showed it was a far from happy and glorious time being sandwiched between an inefficient aircraft industry and politics.The industry was struggling to adapt to peacetime conditions after full scale war production and trading models designed for war, coupled with outmoded management, inefficient and dispersed logistics and manufacturing techniques.The politicians accepting the Country was near financially ruined after the war had seemingly little vision of the technical potential under their charge and very limited understanding of changing technologies and military requirements and intellectual property based on UK and alliance commitments at home as well as the important cash and employment generating export markets.The book tells the story of the men who designed and tested flew British aircraft that had the potential to and did in rare cases be great successes in production and in use by the military It also features the career of the Canadian Bill Waterton, one of the UK s finest test pilots, and his work and struggles to not only test ground breaking planes, but also to have his views and recommendations about them heard and noted to his final banishment from aerospace circles.Despite record breaking aircraft and industry changing technologies and designs the book charts the consolidation and disappearance of world renowned names and project cancellations at various stages of development and maturity.Anyone with a passing interest in how the UK aircraft industry faired after the Second World War or the iconic marques mentioned above will find this book interesting An account of the all too brief postwar period when Britain led the world in innovative aircraft design, and how that lead was irretrievably lost by a series of accidents and bad decisions The author was captivated by thrilling air displays as a child in the 1950s, and his enthusiastic descriptions made me wish I could have shared this book with my late father, who got his love of fast, airborne metal from roughly contemporary experiences. Read this book and weep, if you are a Briton The British Aviation industry led the world at one stage with some spectacular air craft, but we also had some amazingly bad politicos who would get the most brilliant aircraft up into the skies, only to see it cancelled The author records all the highs and lows on that Indian summer of British aircraft All so sadly gone and long forever.