[[ READ PDF ]] ⇩ Bounce: Mozart, Federer, Picasso, Beckham, and the Science of Success ⇸ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

Hmm Judging by the high ratings, some people were surprised to hear that the harder you work at stuff, the better you get The surprise is that this is a surprise to some people. [[ READ PDF ]] ↡ Bounce: Mozart, Federer, Picasso, Beckham, and the Science of Success ☞ In the vein of the international bestselling Freakonomics, award winning journalist Matthew Syed reveals the hidden clues to success in sports, business, school, and just about anything else that you d want to be great at Fans of Predictably Irrational and Malcolm Gladwell s The Tipping Point will find many interesting and helpful insights in Bounce Rules for Visiting Federer Pois não Picasso Kalagam Kadhal Isai Beckham The Anger Workbook for Women: How to Keep Your Anger from Undermining Your Self-Esteem, Your Emotional Balance, and Your Relationships (New Harbinger Self-Help Workbook) and the Science of Success ☞ In the vein of the international bestselling Freakonomics Naive Bride, Defiant Wife (Secretly Pregnant...Conveniently Wed, award winning journalist Matthew Syed reveals the hidden clues to success in sports Blood Relations business Jim Bridger "The Grand Old Man of the Rockies" (1922) school Ricanness and just about anything else that you d want to be great at Fans of Predictably Irrational and Malcolm Gladwell s The Tipping Point will find many interesting and helpful insights in Bounce When I first read the title Bounce by Matthew Syed, I wasintrigued with the name of the author than on what the book was about.Mathew Syed a British Journalist and Broadcaster was, as it turned out was born of a British Pakistani father and a Welsh mother To his credentials he was a Five times Men s Single Champion at the Commonwealth Table Tennis Champion and represented Great Britain for two Olympic Games.His book Bounce thus turned out to be a book that focused on excellence in spo When I first read the title Bounce by Matthew Syed, I wasintrigued with the name of the author than on what the book was about.Mathew Syed a British Journalist and Broadcaster was, as it turned out was born of a British Pakistani father and a Welsh mother To his credentials he was a Five times Men s Single Champion at the Commonwealth Table Tennis Champion and represented Great Britain for two Olympic Games.His book Bounce thus turned out to be a book that focused on excellence in sports It is always a great literally contribution when you have an expert with hands on experience share their insights in a manner that is clear, easy to understandMost of the concepts in this book have been borrowed from best sellers like The Outliers, the Talent Code, or Talent is Overrated, which he explicitly and often acknowledges The key focal point that made this book stand out was the biographical summary he was able to provide of champions and what made them that way.Among the many chapters he has outlined in his book, the one principle which I took to heart was the 10,000 hour principle What he states is that what you tend to do for 10,000 hours with total dedication and excellence is what you will be good at and it could be anything And thus debunking the talent myth as they call it That is what made Mozart, Tiger Woods or the William sisters famous for who they were In fact he humbly admits what took him to the top of his game was a simple advantage he had access to learning table tennis and practicing it where so many others did not.Though the book is divided into three sections namely The Talent Myth, Paradoxes of the Mind and Deep Reflections, I felt the book had a singular theme and that was the capacity of any human being to become the best of best if he was able to dedicate the time, effort, money and yes his own life to one single cause with absolute excellence and commitment.Overall, a highly enjoyable book and compulsory reading for anyone of any age group And coming from a person who has achieved success I say it is a very credible source of information and inspiration.Overall rating 10 out of 10 Bounce Matthew SyedI read Syed got a million dollar advance for this, which made quite a few people wonder Apparently he or actually his agent Jonny Geller pitched the book as the Freakonomics of Sport It got reworked along the way so it applies now to life in general, with the title getting dressed up rather late in the process The title had listed Tiger Woods he was dropped, and Bounce was picked as a hook word for the title I am kind of surprised they didn t decide to edit Tiger Bounce Matthew SyedI read Syed got a million dollar advance for this, which made quite a few people wonder Apparently he or actually his agent Jonny Geller pitched the book as the Freakonomics of Sport It got reworked along the way so it applies now to life in general, with the title getting dressed up rather late in the process The title had listed Tiger Woods he was dropped, and Bounce was picked as a hook word for the title I am kind of surprised they didn t decide to edit Tiger out of the text completely I imagine there is quite a bit of pressure with the publisher to make back the million.The book is really very good I ve long had the opinion that genius is developed rather than born, in spite of being preached the talent myth by my parents.I think that the next myth to fall will be the myth only dealt with slightly in this book of age and learning Like the talent myth it has a tiny amount of truth, and an enormous amount of self fulfilling prophecy Recent scientific study is showing that the brain has farplasticity than ever believed throughout your entire life And the thing about adults not growing new brain cells is actually completely false I am certain that anything including language and perfect musical pitch can be learned at any age Just give it the same amount of time and intensity and the right sort of productive practice , all things Syed talks about in this book Perhaps the form of the productive practice changes between the juvenile and adult brain.This book is a collection of quite a few different things Syed is a very insightful and informed thinker and the ideas here are stimulating.For instance one chapter examines the myth of race versus the scientific proof of the non existance of race It s time now for that 19th century pseudo science fossil to die The 2010 US Census lists as separate races Samoan, Guamanian, Chamorro, Pakistani, Fijian, Cambodian, Hmong, Thai, Laotian, Tongan, etc The Tongan race really There is only one race the human race.There s another very interesting chapter which has some new ways to think about performance enhancing substances and methods When is enhancement a good thing, when and why in other circumstances is it not Although there are lots of similarities to the book Outlier by Malcolm Gladwell see my review , i like BounceThere is another book also just out on a similar topic, The Genius in All of Us by David Shenk which is perhaps even a better book Says much about me I m sure, that I much preferred the kiddies version you are awesome Still a fantastic read, and this time with the science only briefly covered in the previous As an educator, I found the first half farinteresting and relevant, whilst the second half on placebo and genetics merely interesting o I have to say that Bounce was a bit like taking a refresher course, having already read Geoff Covlin s Talent Is Overrated, Daniel Coyle s The Talent Code, and Malcolm Gladwell s Outliers, all three of which Syed acknowledges as worthy predecessors So I didn t learn a great deal new from reading Bounce But a refresher, with some new information added, is worthwhile, and so I found this book I should also note that all four books draw on the pioneering work of academic psychologist Anders Eri I have to say that Bounce was a bit like taking a refresher course, having already read Geoff Covlin s Talent Is Overrated, Daniel Coyle s The Talent Code, and Malcolm Gladwell s Outliers, all three of which Syed acknowledges as worthy predecessors So I didn t learn a great deal new from reading Bounce But a refresher, with some new information added, is worthwhile, and so I found this book I should also note that all four books draw on the pioneering work of academic psychologist Anders Ericsson If you want to develop a talent or a skill, practice deliberately with a focused intention for 10,000 hours, and you ll have gone a long way toward acheiving your goal Throw in outstanding peers and quality coaching, and you ll really go far This formula for success replaces that idea that some are simply talented None of these authors gives much credence to genetics No, it s about learning Deliberate practice practicing to get better and to cure weaknesses is what allows real learning and skills improvement Drive a car with no special thought to the matter and you ll be the same after 10,000 hours of driving, but do it in deliberately challenging ways and environments with the intention of improving, and you could be the next Mario Andretti I know, I date myself Seyd does go into some topics that his predecessors didn t, such as placebo effect in other words the power of belief Although he doesn t delve into it, but the placebo effect raises some really interesting issues of the mind body relationship and causation I also enjoyed his chapter on choking , which any athlete or other performer has experienced What it amounts to is that we think when we shouldn t We try to teach the centipede to walk when it should just walk This ties in to the power of ritual in performance, which is another fascinating subject and full of bizarre anecdotes But as an old jock, I can attest to the power and command of rituals In the last section, Seyd touches on drug enhancement what s good and fair and human and what isn t not clear and genetics are blacks better runners On the latter topic, Seyd takes down the idea that blacks, specifically sprinters from west Africa via the U.S and Jamaica and distance runners from Kenya and later Ethiopia have any special genetic endowments It s simply the outlier affect chance, environment, reward, opportunity, etc that makes all of the difference It was a fun, easy, and instructive book, valuable for anyone who has to perform Like us humans Passionate, compelling and misleading What is the genesis of world class achievement in sports and other endeavours such as art Observers usually nominate two variables, exemplified by the following news excerpts about the 2012 Wimbledon finalTalent does what it can Genius does what it must The old Edward Bulwer Lytton aphorism smacked Andy Murray round the head in his first Wimbledon final, his fourth in grand slam tournaments overall Murray was as good as he could be Federer was the mast Passionate, compelling and misleading What is the genesis of world class achievement in sports and other endeavours such as art Observers usually nominate two variables, exemplified by the following news excerpts about the 2012 Wimbledon finalTalent does what it can Genius does what it must The old Edward Bulwer Lytton aphorism smacked Andy Murray round the head in his first Wimbledon final, his fourth in grand slam tournaments overall Murray was as good as he could be Federer was the master we always knew he wasthis was an explainable defeat to the greatest of champions Genius it does you in Paul Hayward, The Telegraph Although we tend to think of genius as something akin to magic, a kind of short cut to mastery of the elements, it is nothing of the sort A proper investigation of the careers of the supreme achievers, whether in sport or other fields, reveals that they are based above all on monomaniacal diligence and concentration Constant struggle, in other words Seen in this light, we might define genius as talent multiplied by effort Dominic Lawson, The IndependentTalent and innate ability vs hard work and deliberative practice Which is the greater anddeterminative force Matthew Syed s Bounce marshals some persuasive data in support of the latter view Drawing on his own experience as an Olympian and world class table tennis player, Syed illustrates the power of practice with flair, passion and no small amount of skill And yet, and yet This book is saddled by an annoying undercurrent, one that detracts from the author s central thesis Syed s inability, even in passing, to acknowledge that ineffable something which is inseparable from world class achievement the talent, the gift, the genetic fortuitousness that must be present for practice to feast upon Or, phrased alternatively those innate qualities that separate elite combatants when the level of practice is roughly equal Gradually, the practice is everything line of argument becomes infuriating Data is cherry picked and counterexamples are ignored To cite two examplesIt is only possible to clock up meaningful practice if an individual has made an independent decision to devote himself to whatever field of expertiseSyed might want to consult Andre Agassi on this one coerced, against his wishes, into a grueling tennis upbringing by his Father Or thatKlein found that for chess experts the move quality hardly changed at all in blitz conditionsLaughable, truly, for anyone with even a rudimentary understanding of high level chess In the end and despite its strengths which are numerous , Bounce exhibits many of the PC sophisms prevalent in the present era and our discomfort with exceptionalism the notion that, by definition, only a very small percentage of people will traverse the upper echelons of achievement, the road to which requires phenomenal levels of hard work and, yes, intrinsic ability How I wish Syed had consulted his own OpEd piece in The Times a few years agoIf every champion who has ever won at Wimbledon symbolises the shattering of 127 rival dreams, each of those also rans represent the shattering of thousandsWe talk about 10,000 hours as the minimum amount of practice time required to attain mastery, and this is a truth that I strongly subscribe to But every player here has practiced 10,000 hours, and then some Many who didn t quite make it have given it everything, too All have become first class players The difference in standard at this level is so miniscule that it is almost impossible to perceive unless you are keeping score.Wimbledon articulates this essential truth with rare eloquence The small few vying for glory, the stars we cheer on Centre Court, represent the shattered dreams of thousands And this is as it should be It is brutal, but it is also, in its way, beautiful To Bounce s prejudice the practice always triumphs over talent, the cynic would reply the opposite that talent always triumphs over practice The real lesson to be learned from Bounce is that practice may not always triumph, but it sometimes does The most valuable talent, paradoxically, might be our capacity to work breathlessly to fulfill it Bounce is an interesting book that paints a valuable picture But it s a partial picture Love this book It goes deep into the process of mastering a skill from a perspective of a world class table tennis pro who presents a mix of personal experience and scientific research The book will teach you what form of practice actually works and what is required to achieve elite world class levels in sports, business, music, driving and pretty much anything Besides purposeful practice the book breaks down other aspects of success such as having quality feedback, learning from failure, en Love this book It goes deep into the process of mastering a skill from a perspective of a world class table tennis pro who presents a mix of personal experience and scientific research The book will teach you what form of practice actually works and what is required to achieve elite world class levels in sports, business, music, driving and pretty much anything Besides purposeful practice the book breaks down other aspects of success such as having quality feedback, learning from failure, environmental factors, breaking out of the comfort zone, beliefs and the powerful benefits of the placebo effect which all play a key role in achieving world class levels.I would highly recommend this book for everyone regardless wherever you do sports, it s gonna give you a new perspective on success, talent and hard work which is vital to understand The world is definitely decades behind science when it comes to attributing success, most people still believe that Jamaicans have special genes for sprinting, or that talent plays a key role in math or music Definitely check out the book, you ll learn a lot Regurgitation of Colvin and Coyle With a heavy spin on sports unfortunately.It focuses on the topic of sports without delving deep into the fascinating topic of deliberate practice and its applications in wider areas.The first half of the book consists of direct quotes from and regurgitation of Colvin and Coyle s books and says nothing new about the alleged main subject of the book.The only difference is that the author makes a foray into the topic of sportsthan his predecessors but I f Regurgitation of Colvin and Coyle With a heavy spin on sports unfortunately.It focuses on the topic of sports without delving deep into the fascinating topic of deliberate practice and its applications in wider areas.The first half of the book consists of direct quotes from and regurgitation of Colvin and Coyle s books and says nothing new about the alleged main subject of the book.The only difference is that the author makes a foray into the topic of sportsthan his predecessors but I found it to be interesting but impractical.I would ve liked to readon Mozart and Picasso and less on the athletes Although the last three chapters sports psychology, East Germany s state sanctioned doping, and the question of whether blacks are inherenty better runners were interesting, they seemed to be extraneously tucked onto the book and didn t cohere all that well with the main subject of the book.I recommend Colvin and Coyle s books, and only if you re interested in the sports angle of deliberate practice, read this Otherwise, keep away Unfortunately, I really didn t like this book Seyd tries realy hard to write a story abuot success, but it ends up being somewhere between Malcolm Gladwell and Steven Pinker success is a combination of hard work and being fortunate with the middle ground between good nature and nurture It s hard for me not to be biased because I ve read so many of these stories that they feel like they are only rehashing the ideas of others.I don t think success is easy, but in my own life and from the stori Unfortunately, I really didn t like this book Seyd tries realy hard to write a story abuot success, but it ends up being somewhere between Malcolm Gladwell and Steven Pinker success is a combination of hard work and being fortunate with the middle ground between good nature and nurture It s hard for me not to be biased because I ve read so many of these stories that they feel like they are only rehashing the ideas of others.I don t think success is easy, but in my own life and from the stories of others, I find success to be an attitude and a mindset Yes, success takes work and yes, success requires a convergence of opportunity, but I really don t like it when people try to give universal advice on success It is always either general vague or too narrow and specific I think there are so many other works on the subject better than this book here