#Read Book á 3,096 Days á eBook or E-pub free

Wow I don t know if my English vocabulary will be enough to describe everything I felt reading this so expect a lot of grammar errors , but I feel the need of doing it in English hopping this way it will be read bypeople than writing this in Spanish, because I think everybody should read this book Well written considering this girl has nothing else than basic education, provided mostly by herself and her incredible desire of superation, inside and outside her imprisonment This woman, s Wow I don t know if my English vocabulary will be enough to describe everything I felt reading this so expect a lot of grammar errors , but I feel the need of doing it in English hopping this way it will be read bypeople than writing this in Spanish, because I think everybody should read this book Well written considering this girl has nothing else than basic education, provided mostly by herself and her incredible desire of superation, inside and outside her imprisonment This woman, since she stopped being a girl earlier than usual, is the most brave woman I have ever met This book is incredible human because is written by the principal actor in the story, with a truly perspective of the feelings and mechanisms she had to developed to survived The major sign of human intelligence is the hability of adaptation to new situations, because that s what survival relies on And that s what she had to do although after her autoliberation she was judge by the public opinion for developing this mechanisms, totally involuntaries since she had no idea they were growing inside her mind, she didn t had other choice and they were necessaries for her spiritual, physical, psychological and emotional survival She is an incredible woman She never forget who she was no matter how much mental manipulation Priklopil practiced on her Is this manipulation since she was a little girl what creates her mental imprisonment , an illusion of total dependence on her abductor, of being less than nothing, that creates the false idea that she wouldn t be able to scape She explains this manipulation so good in her book, that we start to understand why the victims of family violence don t leave either What I will never understand is how we,as a society, can be so cruel to judge this people Why doesn t this person leave Maybe he she likes being bitten Why this girl didn t leave her captor sooner She had some opportunities Maybe she really didn t want lo leave him NO That s not it It s a mental inability to believe in their selves created for the agressor s lies She achieves to autoliberates herself, first from her mental imprinsonment, and this gave her the power to actually physically leave, and she is judge by us because she wants to rule HER life HER way, because she refuses to give the morbid details necessaries for us to really feel sorry for her otherwise she doesn t deserve our sympathy, which, by the way, she had NEVER ask for Now Natascha and her story are not enough for our expectations And knowing how difficult is to grow healthy, to achieve normally in this society, even in a regular family, I ask myself how many of us, who judge Natascha, would be able not only to survive but to keep the hability of being happy, of not being defined by such a horrible experience and be able to move on and built a happy and normal life So, yes, I feel incredibly proud of this woman that I had never met except on papers and news She is not only brave and intelligent but an amazing human being, for being able to feel sympathy for a very sad little man in an ambient of sadness, crazyness and torture, for never let herself go, and for go on.I wish this book means closure for her, and she can star what she always dream for herself I am not able to rate this book.I have finished it a week ago and since then I have tried to decide which rating would be appropriate I can t even find the right words for a proper review All I can say is that it kept me in a constantly alternating state of fury, horror and tearfulness.I simply can t rate this book. #Read Book ⚛ 3,096 Days Ö OnMarchten year old Natascha Kampusch was snatched off the street by a stranger and bundled into a white van Hours later she found herself in a dark cellar, wrapped in a blanket When she emerged eight years later, her childhood had gone In , Days Natascha tells her incredible story for the first time her difficult childhood, what exactly happened on the day of her abduction, her imprisonment in a five square metre dungeon, and the mental and physical abuse she suffered from her abductor, Wolfgang Priklopil , Days is ultimately a story about the triumph of the human spirit It describes how, in a situation of almost unbearable hopelessness, she slowly learned how to manipulate her captor And how, against inconceivable odds, she managed to escape unbroken La source blanche : L'étonnante histoire des dialogues avec l'Ange wrapped in a blanket When she emerged eight years later Le sourire à visage humain : Suivi de Citoyen, citoyenneté et Encore plus de plus her childhood had gone In Soigner les plantes par les huiles essentielles et les huiles végétales Days Natascha tells her incredible story for the first time her difficult childhood Préparation aux examens de coiffure CAP : Sciences et technologie what exactly happened on the day of her abduction Joyeux anniversaire - Livre d'or à écrire - 18 ans - taille M - Violet her imprisonment in a five square metre dungeon Le Démon et mademoiselle Prym and the mental and physical abuse she suffered from her abductor ECG en pratique courante : Situation clinique, examen, commentaire Wolfgang Priklopil La planète aux vents de folie (La romance de Ténébreuse, tome 1) Days is ultimately a story about the triumph of the human spirit It describes how Mes 9 Procédés Secrets Pour Accroître l'Autonomie Affective (2ième Édition) in a situation of almost unbearable hopelessness Mes 9 Procédés Secrets Pour Accroître l'Autonomie Affective (2ième Édition) in a situation of almost unbearable hopelessness Beyond Tomorrow against inconceivable odds Beyond Tomorrow she managed to escape unbroken I was so impressed with Natascha I felt that she told the story of her abduction, her escape, and her re entry into society, with great care, and skill I totally support her choice to not reveal everything that took place during those years To me, her refusal typifies the strength of character that she most certainly possesses.I also agree with her opinion of the Stockholm Syndrome Natascha wrote, If I wanted to survive in this new world, I had to cooperate with him For somebody who has I was so impressed with Natascha I felt that she told the story of her abduction, her escape, and her re entry into society, with great care, and skill I totally support her choice to not reveal everything that took place during those years To me, her refusal typifies the strength of character that she most certainly possesses.I also agree with her opinion of the Stockholm Syndrome Natascha wrote, If I wanted to survive in this new world, I had to cooperate with him For somebody who has never been in such an extreme situation of oppression, this may be difficult to comprehend But today I am proud of the fact that I was able to take this step towards the person who had robbed me of everything Because that step saved my life even though I had to dedicateandenergy to maintaining this positive approach to the kidnapper As she says, it is often used as a glib label, turning victims into victims a second time, by taking from them the power to interpret their own story and by turning the most significant experiences from their story into the product of a syndrome The term places the very behaviour that contributes significantly to the victim s survival that much closer to being objectionable Getting closer to the kidnapper is not an illness Creating a cocoon of normality within the framework of a crime is not a syndrome Just the opposite It is a survival strategy in a situation with no escape and muchtrue to reality than the sweeping categorization of criminals as bloodthirsty beasts and of victims as helpless lambs that society refuses to look beyond 4 Stars It touched my heart, and or gave me much food for thought I read this several months ago But then I recently read The Girl in the Cellar And now this one is clicking so much better it is hard to rate a book like this with any number of stars i applaud ms kampusch for having the courage and strength to make it through the ordeal without losing herself, and to process it in part by writing down her story in my opinion, her account gives very good insight in the damage that is done not only to the body, but also to the mind and soul of the victim of a violent crime she describes in a detached way the mechanisms her mind resorted to, like feeling compassion for the abuser a it is hard to rate a book like this with any number of stars i applaud ms kampusch for having the courage and strength to make it through the ordeal without losing herself, and to process it in part by writing down her story in my opinion, her account gives very good insight in the damage that is done not only to the body, but also to the mind and soul of the victim of a violent crime she describes in a detached way the mechanisms her mind resorted to, like feeling compassion for the abuser and dissociating during abuse it sounds a bit like she feels a need to justify her behavior and most definitely to educate her audience sadly, in the latter point, i agree with her it is shocking to hear how she perceived ordinary people outside of her prison as indifferent and bored when she finally asks for help, the woman whose door she rings says so why are you coming to me just imagine and yet, does it surprise anyone it does not surprise me i agree with ms kampusch when she says that society needs monsters like her abductor an abuser, such spectacular cases where everything seems so clear, where pointing fingers to the bad one is so easy just so that they can forget about what is happening maybe right next door, about the crimes done to their own children s friends, or maybe even their own children in some parts of the book, i feel that ms kampusch generalizes a bit too far, based on her own story i dont think she can make a substantial statement on whether or not there wasthan one perpetrator in the dutroux case, where the victims lived through a similar, yet different kind of nightmare, and survived it with their own coping mechanisms on the whole, the book is reads like a detached, factual, analytical account from today s perspective it does not go deep into emotions, barely at all and maybe this is why it feels a bit dry , or at least different than what i and maybe others expected in any case, writing this book just the way she did it was one step on the healing path of this courageous and strong woman, and as such, it is valuable beyond any stars or critiques A rare look at a kidnap victim s story, after she was able to escape her abductor after 8 years imprisonment Her true tale from her own perspective, including her feelings about her kidnapper, and the Stockholm Syndrome, among many other things Natascha Kampusch was taken by Wolfgang Priklopil in March, 1998 when she was only 10 years old, on her way to school She was locked away, sleeping underground in a basement like dungeon, where she was eventually starved, beaten, and treated as a slave A rare look at a kidnap victim s story, after she was able to escape her abductor after 8 years imprisonment Her true tale from her own perspective, including her feelings about her kidnapper, and the Stockholm Syndrome, among many other things Natascha Kampusch was taken by Wolfgang Priklopil in March, 1998 when she was only 10 years old, on her way to school She was locked away, sleeping underground in a basement like dungeon, where she was eventually starved, beaten, and treated as a slave Later she was forced to work for her tormentor doing remodeling of the home s interior.Priklopil kept her in a weakened state, and tried to kill her spirit, in an effort to bind her to him, and make her give up all thoughts of escaping But she kept a flame of hope alive always, by thinking of her family, and freedom, and she never allowed him to totally bend her to his will I remember reading a magazine article about her story awhile back, and how she tried to keep some privacy about her story She really didn t want to be in the public eye, which is understandable This is the first time her story has really been told I was amazed and so impressed at how her spirit survived all the abuse she was subjected to by that man with physical beatings all the time, and concerted attacks on her mentally also She s quite the survivor And then all the weirdness that follows from the public, after she managed to free herself An excellent story How do you begin to rate or review something so personal This book was hard to get through, not only because of the content but also the writing style It was at hard times to follow and she seemed to contradict her experiences throughout She spends multiple pages vehemently denying she has suffered from Stockholm syndrome all the while saying how evil but kind her kidnapper was A huge portion of the book is dedicated to her difficult childhood From someone who suffered so much later it wa How do you begin to rate or review something so personal This book was hard to get through, not only because of the content but also the writing style It was at hard times to follow and she seemed to contradict her experiences throughout She spends multiple pages vehemently denying she has suffered from Stockholm syndrome all the while saying how evil but kind her kidnapper was A huge portion of the book is dedicated to her difficult childhood From someone who suffered so much later it was rather strange to hear some of her complaints of her childhood I was now 5 years old and I had gone from being a cheerful toddler to an insecure, taciturn person who no longer liked life I cannot begin to imagine the difficulty of writing of such experiences so I don t want to sound harsh but many things felt glossed over about her times in captivity It is hard to rate a book like this with any number of stars As this book wasn t written for entertainment, thus it is unfair to review it in a similar way of reviewing novels This book is so incredibly scary, so difficult even to read This was a detailed and grueling account of a real abduction It shows us a harsh slice of reality I cannot imagine how difficult it must have been to Natascha to actually survive this all Most people will be familiar with at least the basics of Natascha Kamp It is hard to rate a book like this with any number of stars As this book wasn t written for entertainment, thus it is unfair to review it in a similar way of reviewing novels This book is so incredibly scary, so difficult even to read This was a detailed and grueling account of a real abduction It shows us a harsh slice of reality I cannot imagine how difficult it must have been to Natascha to actually survive this all Most people will be familiar with at least the basics of Natascha Kampusch s story a 10 year old girl who was dragged from the street and abducted The rest of her childhood and youth is spent as prisoner, like a slave For most of it, she is forced to live in a tiny room, cleverly hidden behind many doors She has to endure a lot of pain and suffering Isolation, humiliation, brutal beatings, starvation, sexual abuse This would ve broken most people, but I am truly glad that it didn t break this brave woman.I was so sorry to learn about the death of her beloved grandmother during her captivity I understand how deep the bond between grandparents and grandchildren can be, and how devastating it feels when something happens to one of them A great read of a Survivor What an inspiring brave woman her attitudes towards her captor and horrific experience should be admired and looked upon as courageous caring and a true human that can see things for how they really are and not what society blinded likes to believe evil people are I can t imagine I could be as forgiving and strong like her, very few could but it is the truest way to be able to move on All the best I hope she can have a somewhat normal wonderful life I remember the television footage when Natascha Kampusch first escaped from captivity back in 2008 I m not someone who watches the news much, but something about her story captivated me then, so when I discovered she d written a memoir about her experience, I downloaded the ebook immediately and was glued to my Kindle in every spare moment for the next couple of days Others have criticised Kampusch for painting a poor me account of her childhood before the abduction I disagree, though I fou I remember the television footage when Natascha Kampusch first escaped from captivity back in 2008 I m not someone who watches the news much, but something about her story captivated me then, so when I discovered she d written a memoir about her experience, I downloaded the ebook immediately and was glued to my Kindle in every spare moment for the next couple of days Others have criticised Kampusch for painting a poor me account of her childhood before the abduction I disagree, though I found this part of the book a little slow as an opening to the story we ve all been waiting to hear Structurally it may have been better to weave the backstory through by showing her memories once imprisoned However, I believe these details highlighted the kinds of factors that had made hervulnerable to becoming a kidnapper s prey important insights for all who work with or parent children Kampusch has also been criticised by readers for the starkness of her prose, but to me it felt utterly appropriate This is not a novel and the events and circumstances she describes need no additional dramatisation, nor emotive language to win our sympathy It is enough that she has had the courage to share her story in such detail, not shrinking from any of the atrocities he committed, with the exception of his sexual abuse I respect and understand the choice Kampusch has made in not including this aspect of her enslavement to him She wrote the book only four years after her escape It s early days yet for her to be processing and healing what has happened to her, and to expose herself to such a degree may well have compounded the damage done Having been abused myself as a child, I can testify that it was only when I turned forty that I realised the full significance of what had been lost and was able to express the rage it had never been safe to feel as a child Around that time I was finally able to cut myself off from the perpetrators of the abuse as well as, for a time, from the family member who had allowed it all to happen But early in my adult life I existed in a kind of numb ambivalence, both resenting what had happened to me and yet longing for the love and approval of those who had controlled, manipulated and abused me and who had also, contradictorily, been primary attachment figures and sources of love and affection Natascha Kampusch s story will no doubt evolve as she grows older anddistant from the memories that must still be so vivid to her, even now In sharing her story so soon, she has given a great gift to the world, allowing us to see inside the mind of a child, and later a young woman, subjected to such an experience I found this book utterly compelling and was awe struck again and again by her ability, as a small child, to adapt, to accept, to find ways of normalising her experience I remember years ago, reading The Lovely Bones and Lucky by Alice Sebold a piece of fiction and a memoir inspired by Sebold s personal experience of rape I felt deeply moved at the time by the way in which she had taken something so dark and made it into a story that was achingly beautiful I felt as though a littlelight had spilled into my own world, by reading her stories and knowing that others had survived and grown strong through experiences farhorrendous than I could ever imagine In a similar vein, I finished Kampusch s memoir with a deep sense of gratitude and confirmation there are no born monsters out there, only other human beings who have become monstrous through their own suffering The world and its people are not so easily divided into good and evil as some of us would like to think, Or in Kampusch s words, It makes people uncomfortable whenever categories of Good and Evil begin to topple, and they are confronted with the fact that personified Evil also had a human face His dark side didn t simply fall from the sky nobody is born a monster And then, Nothing is all black or all white And nobody is all good or all evil That also goes for the kidnapper These are words that people don t like to hear from an abduction victim Because the clearly defined concept of good and evil is turned on its head, a concept that people are all too willing to accept so as not to lose their way in a world full of shades of grey I think what s most remarkable and real about her story is that right from the beginning she was able to see and connect with her captor s human face and in fact this is probably what enabled her to survive so long and ultimately to escape Perhaps if she had only been able to see him as a monster, her terror and hatred would have destroyed her or destroyed her sanity very early in the experience I tried to see the kidnapper as a person who was not essentially evil, but had only become so in the course of his life In no way did this mitigate what he had done, but it helped me to forgive himHad I met him only with hatred, that hatred would have eaten me up and robbed me of the strength I needed to make it through If I wanted to survive in this new world, I had to cooperate with him For somebody who has never been in such an extreme situation of oppression, this may be difficult to comprehend But today I am proud of the fact that I was able to take this step towards the person who had robbed me of everything Because that step saved my life even though I had to dedicateandenergy to maintaining this positive approach to the kidnapper Another aspect of Kampusch s story that I find fascinating is her rejection of the label Stockholm Syndrome I have often fallen back on this concept to understand my own attachment to and defence of the individuals who robbed me of my safety and innocence as a child I had not considered, until reading this book, that this is another way of buying into the victim role, reinforcing my powerlessness rather than my powerfulness in finding a way to live with, survive and accept my experience As she says, it is often used as a glib label, turning victims into victims a second time, by taking from them the power to interpret their own story and by turning the most significant experiences from their story into the product of a syndrome The term places the very behaviour that contributes significantly to the victim s survival that much closer to being objectionable Getting closer to the kidnapper is not an illness Creating a cocoon of normality within the framework of a crime is not a syndrome Just the opposite It is a survival strategy in a situation with no escape and muchtrue to reality than the sweeping categorization of criminals as bloodthirsty beasts and of victims as helpless lambs that society refuses to look beyond I feel very blessed that in beginning to write my own childhood memoir, as part of my healing journey, I stumbled across a writing mentor, Barbara Turner Vesselago www.freefallwriting.com who was wise enough to recognise that my interpretation and telling of my story in my late twenties was holding me firmly imprisoned in the role of victim My early clumsy attempts to describe what had happened to me were tightly controlled by a narrative voice that knew what was right and what was wrong, that judged and drew clear boundaries between perpetrator and victim Gently, but firmly, Barbara guided me to open out my telling into scenes that would show the kinds of interactions that proliferated through my childhood She gave me the courage to step back into those scenes with the wide open eyes of innocence, of a being who has not yet divided the world into black and white, right and wrong This journey continued as I wrote my memoir under her guidance over about twelve years TheI was able to step back into those memories and to show them without interpreting them, theI discovered the humanity of those I had hated and judged, and yet longed to be loved by This clear eyed approach to retelling my own story in many ways set me free from that storyallowing me to shed my caterpillar cocoon of victimhood and to emerge with the transformative power of butterfly words and stories to make beautiful through words what had once been ugly and shameful, and to recognise through this process, those qualities that had developed through my suffering to become my core strengths I was humbled, also, to recognise the humanity of those who had harmed me and to have empathy for their suffering, while making the empowered choice to disconnect my life from theirs I wonder if it would have beendifficult for Kampusch to share her story with the world if her kidnapper had lived after her escape I am nearly fifty now and my unpublished memoir still sits on my shelves, in spite of winning me a fellowship at Varuna Writer s House and the confidence of then Creative Director, Peter Bishop, that he could find me a publisher I remember during my retreat at Varuna, Peter telling me that one of the things that stood out in my memoir was the empathy and lack of judgement with which I was able to represent all the characters involved And yet I have hesitated to make my story public, for many complex reasons, including the preservation of privacy for all concerned, and a reluctance to freeze frame one individual s interpretation of a story upon which there must be many other evolving perspectives My own understanding continues to evolve most surprisingly towards gratitude for the qualities of humility, strength and compassion bestowed by suffering At this point in my life, I feel the best I can do is convert my experience and insights into a fictional set of characters in circumstances that are comparable to ones I experienced as a child and young adultbut not the same I have been re inspired by Kampusch s memoir because it has affirmed my own belief that it is forgiveness, understanding and a capacity to see all the shades of grey in our experience of being human that will ultimately set us free free from judgment, from self righteousness, from any kind of idealism that divides the world and other people into good and evil, and from concepts of heaven and hell in which some of us are rewarded and some of us are condemned to eternal damnation By giving us a glimpse into the fractured mind and world of her captor, by acknowledging his conscience, his flawed attempts to reach for a dream, his vulnerability, Kampusch has turned and faced the monster that others run from in their nightmares She has held him in her arms and known his pain That she was able to do this from so young an age is testament to her wisdom and strength, and perhaps, as she says, it was also the key to her ultimate liberation from that hellish underground world she was trapped in for so many years I have a hunch that we could all learn from Kampusch s ultimate triumph We, including me, are so quick to judge others, to point our fingers, to reject, and to punish And yet what have these responses brought us but a world that is increasingly divided, fragmented and hostile Her story reminds me of a poem Soul Loss by Meiling Jin in which the protagonist is robbed of her soul a demon who taunts and torments her until she steps of her own accord into the demon s mouth and discovers that instead of being engulfed by the demon, she is able to swallow him whole, returning what has been feared and rejected to her own inner wholeness Natascha Kampusch triumphed through courage, love and forgiveness, not through fear, hatred and judgment She also held fast, through all the years, to a vision of her own freedom, to a stronger self, beckoning to her from a brighter future She visualised and wrote to this older self, who wrote back and spoke to her, promising her that one day she would be strong enough to break free I find it remarkable that a child discovered for herself this strategy for maintaining and building her independence and courage over the years, in circumstances where many others might have been broken, succumbing fully to the imposition of the kidnapper s will or choosing death as an escape This is a book I will ponder on and celebrate for many years to come, with awe, gratitude and empathy for its author