&FREE EBOOK ⇧ The View from Castle Rock ⇦ Ebook or Kindle ePUB free

Free online link to the one short story The View from Castle Rock emigration voyage of one family over the sea from Scotland to Nova Scotia, Canada The year is 1918 A husband and pregnant wife, their young son, an elderly father and a brother and sister It is the trip itself that is the focal point The emotions and thoughts of each come through well Fears, hopes and expectations are palpable Use of the Scottish brogue makes the telling feel authe Free online link to the one short story The View from Castle Rock emigration voyage of one family over the sea from Scotland to Nova Scotia, Canada The year is 1918 A husband and pregnant wife, their young son, an elderly father and a brother and sister It is the trip itself that is the focal point The emotions and thoughts of each come through well Fears, hopes and expectations are palpable Use of the Scottish brogue makes the telling feel authentic We learn also of how their lives will play out in the new land This was a good story I liked it Alice Munro follows her ancestors from Scotland, the old country, to North America The stories she tells are partly true, partly made up Munro has studied old documents, both in Scotland, and in Canada From the persons she found in them, she has cut out the paper doll figures she wanted her ancestors to be.The last part of the book is about Alice Munro herself How she grew up on a fox farm in Ontario, restricted by the unwritten rules of the countryside Know your place Don t waste your Alice Munro follows her ancestors from Scotland, the old country, to North America The stories she tells are partly true, partly made up Munro has studied old documents, both in Scotland, and in Canada From the persons she found in them, she has cut out the paper doll figures she wanted her ancestors to be.The last part of the book is about Alice Munro herself How she grew up on a fox farm in Ontario, restricted by the unwritten rules of the countryside Know your place Don t waste your life on books.I like Alice Munro s writing She is there, she identifies with her characters, at the same she keeps her distance And she is respectful Always, I think this is my new favorite Alice Munro collection Usually in her collections in all collections of stories there s a clunker or two, stories that seem to be there merely to fill out the book Not so in this one It s solid all the way through.This book reminds me a bit of Munro s book The Beggar Maid, which is pretty close to a novel in that it follows a single character s life through a series of stories, from childhood to middle age This one extends the reach of the narratives on eith I think this is my new favorite Alice Munro collection Usually in her collections in all collections of stories there s a clunker or two, stories that seem to be there merely to fill out the book Not so in this one It s solid all the way through.This book reminds me a bit of Munro s book The Beggar Maid, which is pretty close to a novel in that it follows a single character s life through a series of stories, from childhood to middle age This one extends the reach of the narratives on either end, encompassing tales of the narrator s Scottish ancestors, beginning in 1695, and extending all the way through the narrator s old age and even a foretaste of death Munro notes in the foreword that the stories are fictionalized, but are also closer to her own experience than any she s published before The first half of the book is focused on the narrator s family legendary tales of ancestors who are close to folk heroes, an imagined Atlantic crossing by a group of family members, struggles to establish homes out of the bush, and finally her own father and mother s faltering attempts to make a living The stories in the second half zero in on the narrator s own experiences of family, passion, work and class distinctions, marriage though the narrator s own marriage is addressed only out of the corner of her eye , landscape and change, and, in the penultimate story, history.The Canadian title of The Beggar Maid is Who Do You Think You Are , which I think is far superior Likewise, I think a better title for this book might be the title of the penultimate story, What Do You Want to Know For The title comes up while the narrator is investigating a mysterious unmarked burial mound that she and her husband have discovered off a rural road in Huron County She s poking around in the library, aware that such researches may seem strange In fact, such investigations are what the book is all about a probing of one s past, both the distant family past andproximate personal past for whatever it might yield as an answer to the mysteries of existence It happens mostly in our old age, Munro writes of this urge in her Epilogue, when our personal futures close down and we cannot imagine sometimes cannot believe in the futures of our children s children We can t resist this rifling around in the past, sifting the untrustworthy evidence, linking stray names and questionable dates and anecdotes together, hanging on to threads, insisting on being joined to dead people and therefore to life Of course, Munro has been engaged in this activity, this rifling through untrustworthy evidence, this tying together of threads, throughout her career It s no wonder that, in pursuing the activity that captures the imagination of so many people in their latter years, Munro has produced a work of such fascinating range and depth This was my first Alice Munro book, and I approached through a fog of reviews that were running out of accolades the best fiction writer now working in North America a sculptor of the human condition nothingand nothing less than an artist One of the great storytellers of our time, descended from a line going back to Chekhov and Katherine Mansfield Oh dear Obviously due to my own ineptitude, I was unable to grasp much of this at all For the most part I found this book boring, This was my first Alice Munro book, and I approached through a fog of reviews that were running out of accolades the best fiction writer now working in North America a sculptor of the human condition nothingand nothing less than an artist One of the great storytellers of our time, descended from a line going back to Chekhov and Katherine Mansfield Oh dear Obviously due to my own ineptitude, I was unable to grasp much of this at all For the most part I found this book boring, boring, boring.It was based on the history of Munro s own family, going right back to William Laidlaw, Laidlaw was Munro s family name born at the end of the 17th century.and it continued up to modern times Munro makes it clear that these tales are stories though, and not simply biographical.In fact I did enjoy a couple of them based on her family history during the 19th century Illinois and The Wilds of Morris Township In the first there was a unexpected and gripping storyline,and I enjoyed the subtle quirkiness of the characters, in the second I was intrigued by the harsh demands of frontier life, beautifully described by Munro But for the most part I couldn t wait to finish the book I felt that an author of her stature should be read from beginning to end, so I did stick it out, but I didn t find it enjoyable I am wondering if my education were better I might have enjoyed it.but I suspect not I think I need a bit of Sturm and Drang in my fiction, and hooks that are probably foundin books for the mass market Oh woe is plebby me One thing was really good, and that was a review I found of the book written by someone here at Goodreads who had enjoyed it I found it fascinating to read about the ways in which the book had been attractive to her, plus it is just a great review Highly recommended for anyone thinking of reading the book.http www.goodreads.com review show Disappointing Not what you would expect from the queen of short stories If this is the first Munro you pick up, do yourself a favour and put it down Pick another. There is a picture on the wall,Dipped in a colorful pall,Drop of smoke drips aboutAnd the canvas speaks aloud.Bunch of heads, small and big,Bodies, bountiful and frail Walk into the others worldLighting up a shiny trail.Days lived in the sunny cavern,Nights held in the dreams, forlorn,Flossed emotions in the heart,Family that grows never apart Strangers sparkle at the eyes edge,Enlivening the mighty illusions,Which is the bliss of nostalgiaAnd the unformed reunions.All words that explain the w There is a picture on the wall,Dipped in a colorful pall,Drop of smoke drips aboutAnd the canvas speaks aloud.Bunch of heads, small and big,Bodies, bountiful and frail Walk into the others worldLighting up a shiny trail.Days lived in the sunny cavern,Nights held in the dreams, forlorn,Flossed emotions in the heart,Family that grows never apart Strangers sparkle at the eyes edge,Enlivening the mighty illusions,Which is the bliss of nostalgiaAnd the unformed reunions.All words that explain the walk,Get fused into the grave at last,And the picture on the wallTurns silent at one life, past Is it possible that this is my first Alice Munro Yes, I believe that it is In fact, though I ve known the name for a long time, when her name came up in conversation a couple months ago as someone I should read, I first wrote it down in my notebook as Alice Monroe because it didn t click initially for me Stellar.This book was primarily recommended because Family History It s technically fiction, but my mentor thought it would be good for me to read it and see how someone writes about famil Is it possible that this is my first Alice Munro Yes, I believe that it is In fact, though I ve known the name for a long time, when her name came up in conversation a couple months ago as someone I should read, I first wrote it down in my notebook as Alice Monroe because it didn t click initially for me Stellar.This book was primarily recommended because Family History It s technically fiction, but my mentor thought it would be good for me to read it and see how someone writes about family history stuff It s not that easy, especially when you don t know that much about the part of your family about which you are trying to write, especially when you are writing nonfiction So it was difficult for me to read this and keep in mind that it s fiction, short stories based on her family stories which is similar to something I tried to do in my undergrad years before some less than helpful professors tried to take it in a different direction and it turned into something I didn t care much about.Munro is clearly a talented writer I know people love her and she is one of those Canadian goddesses thatpeople should read But I will be real the writing often left me feeling cold I was surprised by that I loved the words on the page, the way the sentences rolled, but by the end of each story I found myself uncertain about how I felt about it as a whole That s sort of strange to experience, especially by someone so many have told me they adore.Flipping through the book now, I wonder if a lot of it has to do with the short sentences I don t normally mind that sort of thing, and sometimes it works really well for an author, but maybe it didn t really work for me in this context Family histories are complex, yes, but can be rife with salacious or juicy details It s sad when they come across as dry at times.Their Christmas tree was in the corner The front room had only one window and if they had put the tree there it would have blocked off all the light It was not a big or well shaped tree, but it was smothered in tinsel and gold and silver beads and beautiful intricate ornaments In another corner of the room was a parlor stove, a woodstove, in which the fire seemed just recently to have been lighted The air was still cold and heavy, with the forest smell of the tree p187 And also, because I have so much going on, the collection of stories was often difficult for me to read That s my fault, not Munro s I m in such a nonfiction place, filled to brim with essays and memoirs, that when I read these stories, I found myself confused when Munro wrote in the first perspective She wrote about herself, yes, but she also wrote about I in the context of family members characters in the 19th century This was discombobulating for me, disorienting So when it was really Munro s personal thoughts or part of the story, I wasn t sure if it was really her voice or not Again, I blame only myself.I want to and will readby Munro I hoped to learn somethingfrom this than I was able, but it s just my place in time right now that prevented it from all coming together.Also, spoiler alert, this has nothing to do with the Hulu show Castle Rock &FREE EBOOK ☄ The View from Castle Rock ⇻ WINNER OF THE NOBEL PRIZE IN LITERATURE Alice Munro mines her rich family background, melding it with her own experiences and the transforming power of her brilliant imagination, to create perhaps her most powerful and personal collection yet A young boy, taken to Edinburgh s Castle Rock to look across the sea to America, catches a glimpse of his father s dream Scottish immigrants experience love and loss on a journey that leads them to rural Ontario Wives, mothers, fathers, and children move through uncertainty, ambivalence, and contemplation in these stories of hopes, adversity, and wonder The View from Castle Rock reveals what is most essential in Munro s art her compassionate understanding of ordinary lives From the Trade Paperback edition الأخلاق والسير melding it with her own experiences and the transforming power of her brilliant imagination Hate Me Today to create perhaps her most powerful and personal collection yet A young boy Hostage to Pleasure taken to Edinburgh s Castle Rock to look across the sea to America A Sister to Scheherazade catches a glimpse of his father s dream Scottish immigrants experience love and loss on a journey that leads them to rural Ontario Wives Seven Psychics mothers Physical Chess: My Life in Catch-As-Catch-Can Wrestling fathers The Night My Bum Dropped: A Gleefully Exaggerated Memoir and children move through uncertainty Freed from Witchcraft ambivalence This Side of Paradise and contemplation in these stories of hopes The Sleeping Tiger adversity Blue Crush and wonder The View from Castle Rock reveals what is most essential in Munro s art her compassionate understanding of ordinary lives From the Trade Paperback edition Marin Preda, a great Romanian author, declared once in an interview, speaking of his most famous character Ilie Moromete, who really existed, was my father I ve always used this quote as an example for my students of how writers like to maintain a deliberate confusion between fiction and reality In her Foreword of The View from Castle Rock, Alice Munro is evenambiguous After informing the reader that there is an historical truth behind her stories, she emphasizes the word stories as Marin Preda, a great Romanian author, declared once in an interview, speaking of his most famous character Ilie Moromete, who really existed, was my father I ve always used this quote as an example for my students of how writers like to maintain a deliberate confusion between fiction and reality In her Foreword of The View from Castle Rock, Alice Munro is evenambiguous After informing the reader that there is an historical truth behind her stories, she emphasizes the word stories as though putting it in opposition with the concept of real events, only to suggest immediately afterwards that reality and fiction are impossible to be told apart, that you can read them, without being wrong, either as the biography of a family or as a narrative inspired by this biography These are stories.You could say that such stories payattention to the truth of life than fiction usually does But not enough to swear on And the part of this book that might be called family history has expanded into fiction, but always within the outline of a true narrative With these developments the two streams came close enough together that they seemed to me meant to flow in one channel, as they do in this book.And you become tired soon enough if you go in search of the truth, that is if you try to separate reality from fiction, the narrator voice from the auctorial voice and the auctorial voice from the real one For the masterstroke of The View from Castle Rock, which, besides, ensures the unity of the text, is the perfect blend of those voices, so much so that some critics named the narrator Alice, in spite of her complete silence regarding her name This is the first writer s privilege Alice Munro makes use of to challenge the reader not only to redefine reality or fiction, if you wish , but also to become comfortable in this hybrid universe The second privilege is to redefine genre It has already been said that Alice Munro does not need to write novels, for her stories are often enough novels in nuce However, this book looks suspiciously like a novel, over, like a saga with, it s true, many pages ripped out And just as the broken parts of the slate tablets could not prevent human imagination to restore Gilgamesh tale, the broken links between the stories can easily be filled in to retrace a line that, as beautifully said Elizabeth Hay in her Introduction is not just the line of blood, but of ink To keep the reader in hesitant balance between the two genres, the writer uses some narrative hooks that unite and divide at the same time the stories The steadiest is the narrative voice, whose reliability is uncertain even when provides documents to support her story, like the letter of her ancestor Old James which, like the other events she talks about, could or could not have existed and does she not, with a subtle irony, urges us to believe only in James Hogg s, her fellow writer, words I belive that Hogg and Walter Scott has gotmoney for Lieing than old Boston and the Erskins got for all the Sermons ever they Wrote and I am surely one of the liars the old man talks about, in what I have written about the voyage Except for Walter s journal, and the letters, the story is full of my inventions.The sighting of Fife from Castle Rock is related by Hogg, so it must be true.Another hook is the leitmotiv of the journey, or journeys, for are many the narrator s from Canada to Scotland in search of her ancestors and from Ontario to Vancouver in search of herself James Laidlaw s from Scotland to Canada to fulfil a dream dreamt on the top of Castle Rock from where he pretended to see the American Coast William Laidlaw s from Scotland to United States to break with family Andrew s from upper Canada to Illinois to bring back with him William s widow and her children and one last travel of the narrator to Illinois to find William s grave In fact it is with the image of a grave that the book symmetrically opens and closes, in the same game of decanting reality until it becomes imaginary a real gravestone, discovered in Scotland, of her direct ancestor, the first William Laidlaw, whose life had had something of the radiance of myth for he was the last to see fairies and ghosts and an imaginary one, since it was never discovered, of the other William Laidlaw, dead of cholera in Illinois In my opinion, though, the most impressive tale the book talks about is the initiatory journey the narrator takes, in which she looks not only for the ancestors that could define her past but for the origin of her gift, of her own need to express herself in writing, to arrive at a proud acknowledgment of a hereditary talent that, like a messenger from the past, gave her the power to reshape reality by flooding timeframe, distance, reality And in one of these houses I can t remember whose a magic doorstop, a big mother of pearl seashell that I recognized as a messenger from near and far, because I could hold it to my ear when nobody was there to stop me and discover the tremendous pounding of my own blood, and of the sea Billed as a collection of stories, spanning the centuries, connecting storytellers to writers, The View from Castle Rock is, as one reviewer stated, a delightful fraud It s a memoir, fleshed out with fiction but based heavily on Alice Munro s family stories, starting with Will O Phaup, star of rumor and myth and proceeding with his descendents as a character study of all the family members who came across the ocean Those Laidlaws and O Phaups who wrote and were written about The Ettick Vall Billed as a collection of stories, spanning the centuries, connecting storytellers to writers, The View from Castle Rock is, as one reviewer stated, a delightful fraud It s a memoir, fleshed out with fiction but based heavily on Alice Munro s family stories, starting with Will O Phaup, star of rumor and myth and proceeding with his descendents as a character study of all the family members who came across the ocean Those Laidlaws and O Phaups who wrote and were written about The Ettick Valley from whence her Scots ancestors came is described it with the ease of those who did live there, as though all these things are as familiar to her as the bush at the back of her family s farm Though she has been there, walking the wet midlands while it rained on and off, she maintains that these are all just stories The emphasis of her Forward ison the flow of these tales from an original source which is never obscured with her liberties.I read slowly at first, dubiously seeing the connections of past leading to stories she may have heard at the fireplace Themes and hand me downs began to quietly appear, family lines branched, yet always returned to Huron County, and to point toward Munro s own life Once I reached my last possible return date for this library book, I began to rip through it, and found the effect not at all negative Nearing the last half of the book the stories become evenpersonal, dealing with people that Munro has observed in her own life, briefly, like her grandparents, orclosely, like her own parents This does not mean she does not illustrate their lives as she did with Will O Phaup, or the little known of William Laidlaw, in fact she may bewilling to illuminate them since she can better see what would or could have been.But I had meant, didn t he think of himself, of the boy who had trapped along the Blyth Creek, and who went into the store and asked for Signs Snow Paper, didn t he struggle for his own self I meant, was his life now something only other people had a use for p166 She takes advantage of knowing these people and conjuring bits of fancy to tie to her memories, the details of her childhood impressions filling in the gaps of old memories reflective commentary solidifies them.It must have meant something, though, that at this turn of my life I grabbed up a book Because it was in books that I would find, for the next few years, my lovers They were men, not boys They were self possessed and sardonic, with a ferocious streak in them, reserves of gloom Not Edgar Linton, not Ashley Wilkes Not one of them companionable or kind p226 My favorite thing about The View from Castle Rock was being reminded that this was a collection of people who could be traced from generation to generation, and Munro s reception of this legacy her family s affection for books, for reading, for writing, for storytelling It s thrilling to read about readers and writers because it s a bond that we and the author share implicitly, and perhaps connects us in a way books about no other occupation can With this, the symbols and connections come with almost no effort, occurring to me in a pleasant and gentle manner I liked finding myself and the things I know easily reflected in several moments across the years, on both sides of the ocean.Read my review on aurora lector