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FREE EBOOK ⚣ The Brothers Karamazov õ The Brothers Karamazov is a murder mystery, a courtroom drama, and an exploration of erotic rivalry in a series of triangular love affairs involving the wicked and sentimental Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov and his three sons the impulsive and sensual Dmitri the coldly rational Ivan and the healthy, red cheeked young novice Alyosha Through the gripping events of their story, Dostoevsky portrays the whole of Russian life, is social and spiritual striving, in what was both the golden age and a tragic turning point in Russian cultureThis award winning translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky remains true to the verbalinventiveness of Dostoevsky s prose, preserving the multiple voices, the humor, and the surprising modernity of the original It is an achievement worthy of Dostoevsky s last and greatest novel Hind Yatra / ہند یاترا a courtroom drama Cuba in War Time and an exploration of erotic rivalry in a series of triangular love affairs involving the wicked and sentimental Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov and his three sons the impulsive and sensual Dmitri the coldly rational Ivan and the healthy Notorious Pleasures red cheeked young novice Alyosha Through the gripping events of their story Writing My Wrongs: Life, Death, and Redemption in an American Prison Dostoevsky portrays the whole of Russian life December Bride is social and spiritual striving How to Weep in Public: Feeble Offerings on Depression from One Who Knows in what was both the golden age and a tragic turning point in Russian cultureThis award winning translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky remains true to the verbalinventiveness of Dostoevsky s prose Grof Monte Kristo II preserving the multiple voices Kerana - Slave of Atlantis the humor The Titus Mandate and the surprising modernity of the original It is an achievement worthy of Dostoevsky s last and greatest novel Above all, don t lie to yourself The man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to a point that he cannot distinguish the truth within him, or around him, and so loses all respect for himself and for others And having no respect he ceases to loveFyodor Dostoevsky The Brothers Karamazov This was my introduction to Russian Literature at the age of 14 I remember buying this at a flea market one weekend for 0.50, feeling very adult since I would be reading a Russian NovelAbove all, don t lie to yourself The man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to a point that he cannot distinguish the truth within him, or around him, and so loses all respect for himself and for others And having no respect he ceases to loveFyodor Dostoevsky The Brothers Karamazov This was my introduction to Russian Literature at the age of 14 I remember buying this at a flea market one weekend for 0.50, feeling very adult since I would be reading a Russian Novel Dostoyevsky started a love affair with Russian literature that exists to this day Oh, and as for the novel, it s one of the best I ve ever read If there was still any doubt, let me confirm that this actually is the greatest book ever written But be warned that you need to set aside a solid month to get through it And it s not light reading this is a dense work of philosophy disguised as a simple murder mystery But it s well worth the effort It tackles the fundamental question of human existence how best to live one s life in a truly engaging way Dostoevsky created 3 brothers Ivan, Alexei, and Dmitri with opposite answers to th If there was still any doubt, let me confirm that this actually is the greatest book ever written But be warned that you need to set aside a solid month to get through it And it s not light reading this is a dense work of philosophy disguised as a simple murder mystery But it s well worth the effort It tackles the fundamental question of human existence how best to live one s life in a truly engaging way Dostoevsky created 3 brothers Ivan, Alexei, and Dmitri with opposite answers to this fundamental question, and set them loose in the world to see what would happen A testament to Dostoevsky s genius is he didn t know how the book would evolve when he started writing As a consequence, the book really isn t about the plot at all, but about how these brothers evolve and deal with their struggles based on their differing world views.Dostoevsky articulates, better than anyone, how human beings really are what I would call walking contradictions Perhaps all of our struggles in life boil down to the reality that we desire contradictory things, simultaneously If you like your novels with good character development, this is the masterwork Dostoevsky s characters arereal,human, than any other At different points along the way, you will identify with them, sympathize with them, curse them, agonize over them, celebrate them You will be moved.Reading this book was a deeply personal experience for me, because I saw myself in one of the characters, and I didn t like what I saw My worldview, in fact my entire direction in life, shifted as a result of this experience I can t guarantee the same results for you, but you owe it to yourself to set aside the time, someday, for the Brothers Karamazov.Be sure to read the Pevear Volokhonsky translation If you like your books to move in a linear fashion this book is not for you It hops around and attention must be paid or you will find yourself flipping back a few pages to reestablish the thread of the story I took this on a plane flight, crazy right Not exactly the normal light reading I take on flights It was a stroke of genius I absolutely fell under the thrall of Dostoyevky s prose Thank you to my fellow travelers who didn t feel the need to chat with the guy who obviously is s If you like your books to move in a linear fashion this book is not for you It hops around and attention must be paid or you will find yourself flipping back a few pages to reestablish the thread of the story I took this on a plane flight, crazy right Not exactly the normal light reading I take on flights It was a stroke of genius I absolutely fell under the thrall of Dostoyevky s prose Thank you to my fellow travelers who didn t feel the need to chat with the guy who obviously is so frilling bored he has resorted to reading a Russian novel I zipped through three hundred pages like it was butter and found myself absolutely captivated by the evolving drama of the Brothers Karamazov, the women that drive them crazy, and the father that brings to mind the words justifiable homicide.I have to give a plug to these Everyman s Library editions A 776 page novel that feels like a 300 page novel Despite the smaller size, the print size is still easily readable I will certainly be picking upof these editions especially the Russian novels that are translated by the magical duo of Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky Translators Volokhonsky and PevearOne of my complaints, when I was in college, and liked to torture myself with the largest most incomprehensible Russian books I could find, was that the nicknames and diminutives of various Russian names increased my frustration level and decreased my ability to comprehend the plots I certainly spent too much time scratching my head and reading feverishly to see if I could figure out from the interactions of the characters if Vanky was actually Ivan or Boris or Uncle Vashy I did not have that issue with this book Despite a plot that skipped around I did not experience the confusion that has marred my memories of other Russian novels This is the story of the Karamazov family The father Fyodor and his four sons There are three legitimate sons Dmitri, Ivan and Alyosha, but I believe that Smerdyakov is also an illegitimate son, though not confirmed by the author given the tendencies of Fyodor to hop on anything in a skirt I would say chances are pretty good that the boy is a Karamazov The recklessness at which Fyodor lived his life is really the basis of the plot The motivations of the other characters all revolve around reactions to the careless and insensitive behavior of the father Dostoyevsky wrote a description of Fyodor that still gives me a shiver every time I read it Fyodor s physiognomy by that time presented something that testified acutely to the characteristics and essence of his whole life Besides the long, fleshy bags under his eternally insolent, suspicious, and leering little eyes, besides the multitude of deep wrinkles on his fat little face, a big Adam s apple, fleshy and oblong like a purse, hung below his sharp chin, giving him a sort of repulsively sensual appearance Add to that a long, carnivorous mouth with plump lips, behind which could be seen the little stumps of black, almost decayed teeth He sprayed saliva whenever he spoke Fyodor is a skirt chaser and since he is rich he can afford to throw these opulent parties that evolve devolve into orgies with the local women Given the description above I can only speculate that gallons and gallons of good vodka must be in play to achieve this end Problems mount as he falls in love lust with a young beauty of dubious morals named Grushenka His oldest son Dmitri is also in love with this young woman and as they both vie for her hand the tension between the Karamazov s ratchets up to dangerous levels Dmitri while pursuing this dangerous siren throws over Katerina, a girl that he owes 3,000 rubles After Fyodor is murdered It was similar to waiting around for someone to kill J.R those same rubles become central to the subsequent trial to convict Dmitri of the murder The murderer is revealed to the reader and as the trial advances the tension increases as we begin to wonder just how the truth will be revealed There are subplots with Father Zosima and his life before becoming a monk Alyosha, the youngest son, was studying to be a monk under Zosima s tutelage, but becomes embroiled in the power struggles of the family and leaves the monastery to seek a life in the real world Alyosha also becomes involved with the care of a dying child named, Ilyusha who is in the book to illustrate the heavy burden that the seemingly inconsequential actions of people can leave on others The book explores that theme extensively It was fascinating to watch the ripple effects of each character s actions as the chapters advance Every time I picked this book up I had to read large chunks because it simply would not let me go The reactions and high drama created by the smallest spark of contention in the characters kept the pages turning and as new information snapped into place I found my pulse quickening as my brain sprang ahead trying to guess where Dostoyevsky was taking me next I worked with a young woman years ago that said that I reminded her of one of the Karamazov brothers Because of the diverse personalities of the brothers, and the fact that I can see a little of myself in each brother I m still left with the grand mystery as to which brother she was referring too It serves me right for waiting so long to read this beautiful book If you wish to see all my most recent book and movie reviews check out I m writing this review as I read Frankly, I m astounded by how good this is and how compelling I m finding it Astounded Why should that be This is a classic, after all True, but it breaks just about every rule of fiction The plot so far is virtually nonexistent three brothers get together with their wastrel father and all sorts of dysfunction, including an odd love triangle involving the father and the eldest son, are revealed The brothers aren t particular close to each other, and re I m writing this review as I read Frankly, I m astounded by how good this is and how compelling I m finding it Astounded Why should that be This is a classic, after all True, but it breaks just about every rule of fiction The plot so far is virtually nonexistent three brothers get together with their wastrel father and all sorts of dysfunction, including an odd love triangle involving the father and the eldest son, are revealed The brothers aren t particular close to each other, and really not much happens except that they meet at a monastery, where the youngest son lives, for an audience with a holy man who s dying, and then they go their separate ways, except that they have kind of random meetings with each other and with the woman involved in the love triangle, and there s a vague sense of foreboding that something will happen to the father And the characters Not really the kinds of characters we re used to in contemporary fiction These are characters who struggle with all kinds of philosophical issues and enjoy nothingthan debating them at length with each other Sounds boring Well, it s not Not at all By the way, I m reading the Ignet Avsey translation based on Kris s recommendation, and it s wonderful so far One of the things I find so fascinating about this book is how it can be both one of the most dark and cynical works I ve read, and one of the most overtly spiritual and soulful This is a true testament to Dostoyevsky s range, to how effortlessly he contains multitudes in this masterful work Alert Some Spoilers to Follow One of the most cynical passages I ve read so far is about how, following the holy man s death, his fellow monks are all shocked when his corpse begins to smell Because of course if he d been a true holy man, they figured, his corpse wouldn t have smelled at all, so the fact that it started smelling makes them all begin to question whether he d really been what they d imagined Soon several of them begin to remember times when he d been shockingly and suspiciously less than holy, and then the pile on really begins, as the monks begin competing to disavow him the most, with only a couple of his friends holding onto his good memory, but even they are cowed into silence by the general gleeful animosity Oh, this Dostoyevsky really knows how to plumb all that s dark and pathetic about human nature After about page 500, the plot really picks up We have murder, a mad dash to a woman, heavy drinking, protestations of love, and the police moving in After the languid plotting of the opening sections, I m almost breathless The use of the narrator here is so interesting We have a nameless figure who lives in the place where the events take place recounting the story almost as if recounting a legend At the same time, we get the characters most intimate thoughts and long speeches that the narrator could not possibly have known first hand It all adds to the notion that this may bethe narrator s own tall tale than any faithful recitation of history which of course is true, because it s a novel, but the way the artificial nature of the story gets highlighted makes me think it s another example of Dostroyevsky s cynicism at work All signs point to Dmitry as the perpetrator, but the way he protests his innocence just makes you want to believe him He s having a hard time of it, though The prosecutor and magistrate conduct a long interview of him, and the evidence is damning.Interestingly, after Dmitry is taken away, the scene shifts radically, revisiting the young boys we d briefly met earlier What is Dostroyevsky doing here In the figure of Kolya, a 13 year old prankster wunderkind, he seems to be pointing out the limits of rationalism, the way it can be abused to wow those with slightly less knowledge and how it can ultimately come off as a big joke Now things have become complicated Who s really guilty of this crime We know who did it because he tells Ivan, but then he blames Ivan himself for his athiesm for influencing him by the notion that nothing we do matters anyway At the beginning of the trial, we see Dostoyevsky s biting and cynical nature reassert itself, as he describes the spectacle that the event has become the people who ve traveled from far away to witness it, drawn by their desire to see the two female rivals for Dmitry and Dmitry himself, who s especially attractive to the ladies because of his reputation as a ladies man The proceedings themselves seem secondary to the spectacle and the sport The trial itself is a fascinating deconstruction of Dmitry s character how that character can be everything the prosecutor says, and yet at the same time, it s everything his defense counsel says too We re given to long speeches about the character that are fascinating psychological studies the lawyers themselves debate about this newfangled science of psychology how plastic it is, how it can be used to justify and explain anything You can see Dostoyevsky working on multiple levels here, showing multiple sides of his character that don t quite cohere, and that s exactly the point, that people are complex and inconsistent and constantly at war with themselves, so what does character mean What does a character mean in a novel And just when it looks like the defense will carry the day The coda is a plan for escape and the funeral of a young boy, and yet it end on a curiously uplifting note, a statement of faith and everlasting remembrance and a change, for the better, in many of the other young boys, united as they are in love of the lost boy, who thus becomes an almost Christian martyr, the one whose death brings love to all his friends And so Dostoyevsky brings to a close his massive masterpiece, and so I end these little scribbles