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!Read E-pub Õ How to Keep Your Cool: An Ancient Guide to Anger Management õ Timeless wisdom on controlling anger in personal life and politics from the Roman Stoic philosopher and statesman SenecaIn his essay On Anger De Ira , the Roman Stoic thinker Seneca cBCAD argues that anger is the most destructive passion No plague has cost the human race dear This was proved by his own life, which he barely preserved under one wrathful emperor, Caligula, and lost under a second, Nero This splendid new translation of essential selections from On Anger, presented with an enlightening introduction and the original Latin on facing pages, offers readers a timeless guide to avoiding and managing anger It vividly illustrates why the emotion is so dangerous and why controlling it would bring vast benefits to individuals and societyDrawing on his great arsenal of rhetoric, including historical examples especially from Caligula s horrific reign , anecdotes, quips, and soaring flights of eloquence, Seneca builds his case against anger with mounting intensity Like a fire and brimstone preacher, he paints a grim picture of the moral perils to which anger exposes us, tracing nearly all the world s evils to this one toxic source But he then uplifts us with a beatific vision of the alternate path, a path of forgiveness and compassion that resonates with Christian and Buddhist ethicsSeneca s thoughts on anger have never been relevant than today, when uncivil discourse has increasingly infected public debate Whether seeking personal growth or political renewal, readers will find, in Seneca s wisdom, a valuable antidote to the ills of an angry age Paradigm Explorer Covered Calls Made Easy: Generate Monthly Cash Flow by Selling Options the Roman Stoic thinker Seneca cBCAD argues that anger is the most destructive passion No plague has cost the human race dear This was proved by his own life Blood Borne (Cathedral Chronicles, which he barely preserved under one wrathful emperor Talk Like an Ancient Egyptian Caligula Between Light and Dark (W.I.T.C.H. Graphic Novels, and lost under a second Remembering Albany Nero This splendid new translation of essential selections from On Anger Chinas Sacred Sites presented with an enlightening introduction and the original Latin on facing pages The Essential Iliad offers readers a timeless guide to avoiding and managing anger It vividly illustrates why the emotion is so dangerous and why controlling it would bring vast benefits to individuals and societyDrawing on his great arsenal of rhetoric Homers Iliad including historical examples especially from Caligula s horrific reign Flush The Twinkles (Who Needs Christmas? anecdotes Traitements parodontaux et lasers en omnipratique dentaire quips EMPIRE Magazine (November 2013) Winter Preview (Hunger Games Catching Fire) Jennifer Lawrence and soaring flights of eloquence Advice for an Only Child Seneca builds his case against anger with mounting intensity Like a fire and brimstone preacher Whom the Gods Hate (God & Mortals, he paints a grim picture of the moral perils to which anger exposes us Grimorium Verum, or The True Grimoire of the Veritable Clavicles of Solomon, at Memphis By Alibeck the Egyptian 1517 tracing nearly all the world s evils to this one toxic source But he then uplifts us with a beatific vision of the alternate path Christians Get Depressed Too a path of forgiveness and compassion that resonates with Christian and Buddhist ethicsSeneca s thoughts on anger have never been relevant than today The Young Hitler I Knew when uncivil discourse has increasingly infected public debate Whether seeking personal growth or political renewal Diapered at Boarding School (An ABDL Tale) readers will find Books For Kids: The Lucky Puppy: Bedtime Stories For Kids Ages 3-8 (Kids Books - Bedtime Stories For Kids - Children's Books - Free Stories) in Seneca s wisdom The Master Mineral Solution of the 3rd Millennium a valuable antidote to the ills of an angry age Paradigm Explorer It s either our ignorance or our arrogance that makes us prone to anger How to Keep Your Cool is James Romm s modern paraphrase of the ancient Greek philosopher senator Seneca s treatise entitled De Ira, or, On Anger Seneca defined anger as a desire to punish a real or perceived wrong therefore, where anger is present, revenge lurks, waiting for its chance to wreak havoc Of all the problematic passions, anger has the potential to destroy the most You might indulge pride, greed or lust, It s either our ignorance or our arrogance that makes us prone to anger How to Keep Your Cool is James Romm s modern paraphrase of the ancient Greek philosopher senator Seneca s treatise entitled De Ira, or, On Anger Seneca defined anger as a desire to punish a real or perceived wrong therefore, where anger is present, revenge lurks, waiting for its chance to wreak havoc Of all the problematic passions, anger has the potential to destroy the most You might indulge pride, greed or lust, but anger can ruin everything you have accumulated in one fell swoop, and often because of petty, even imaginary, conflict He basically treats anger as a poison that lowers an individual s Reason and also amplifies offenses Why be both injured and angry You only injure yourself further.Seneca posits that once anger flares, it is almost too irresistible to control its path of terror Just as it is easier to keep wild animals out of a house than to let them in and try to restrain them, he argues that suppressing or avoiding anger is preferable than trying to manage it once it is aroused He urges his readers to know their personal limits and avoid people and situations that are likely to raise ire To not do so almost guarantees embarrassing foolishness and shenanigans.He proposes cool down periods and rational self talk to help us decipher the real from the imaginary source of injury For example,this is a chair, it is not trying to kill meor, this person did not do this to me, he merely did it and it merely affects me He further advises using empathy to understand the other person s struggle in the situation Maybe they are actually returning an injury we initiated, or maybe they are even acting in our best interest and anyway, haven t we also behaved in similar ways as our opponent He warns that all humans are quick to suspect the worst in other s intentions, and this tendency can either be nurtured or trained into submission, lest it become a ravenous cycle In addition, we can live such self indulgent lifestyles that we become spoiled brats Nothing nurtures anger so much as luxury that lacks restraint and can t stand setbacks Even in instances when we argue that anger may be required, say in military or leadership roles, he says it is better to decide in advance to do the right thing, i.e., protect your family from violence or defend your nation from marauders, than to allow anger to take control in the heat of the moment One of many reasons for this is that anger clouds judgment Similarly, in parenting it is better to set rules in advance, and when they are breached to wait until anger has passed before applying the already agreed upon discipline He says, in doling out punishment, nothing is less suitable than anger Even when others hurt you intentionally, your outrage only rewards the instigator, giving them fuel to perpetrate yetabuse for their amusement Give them cheerful wit instead, and they will move on.Seneca posits that of all the noble things we can achieve in our lives, the mastery of Self is the highest calling Heroic deeds and accomplishments no matter how far they go, how far they extend themselves, are really small, base, and lowly Virtue alone is elevated and lofty Nothing is great unless it is also at peace Maybe it was because I listened to this rather than reading it, but this came across like something written for someone who would like to read a book but just wants the talking points It felt really disjointed to listen to, a highlight reel of Seneca s essay On Anger with the checklist of things you should do to get how to avoid anger along with some flashy parts of torture and bad behavior to maybe titillate and not make you feel like you are just reading a grocery list on how not let an Maybe it was because I listened to this rather than reading it, but this came across like something written for someone who would like to read a book but just wants the talking points It felt really disjointed to listen to, a highlight reel of Seneca s essay On Anger with the checklist of things you should do to get how to avoid anger along with some flashy parts of torture and bad behavior to maybe titillate and not make you feel like you are just reading a grocery list on how not let anger control your life The short passages illustrating various tyrants anger cruelty, was probably my take away and reminded me how seriously fucked up the ruling class was in ancient Rome, where even fairly good or not down right evil emperors did things that would be deemed horrific by today s standards Suetonis I picked this up a few days ago after losing my cool The book is a short selection of essays by Seneca for anyone trying to keep themselves in check Seneca wrote them for Nero, who he was trying to influence. How to Keep Your Cool by Seneca James RommI came to this book after reading St Thomas Aquinas s articles on anger in the Summa Theologica I was surprised at how much the Christian saint relied on the Roman Stoic philosopher for his Christian analysis of anger as both a virtue and a vice.This book is part of Princeton s Ancient Wisdom for Modern Readers series In this series, the texts of classical Roman philosophers are selected and arranged to address a single issue, in this case, anger How to Keep Your Cool by Seneca James RommI came to this book after reading St Thomas Aquinas s articles on anger in the Summa Theologica I was surprised at how much the Christian saint relied on the Roman Stoic philosopher for his Christian analysis of anger as both a virtue and a vice.This book is part of Princeton s Ancient Wisdom for Modern Readers series In this series, the texts of classical Roman philosophers are selected and arranged to address a single issue, in this case, anger The text in question is Seneca s De Ira On Anger The format involves an introduction and fairly extensive extracts from the relevant text I haven t read De Ira, but I found this format to be very accessible.It is fair to say that Seneca s view of anger was extremely negative Anger overrode reason by inflaming the passions In an angry state people ere prone to act inordinately and imprudently The ugliness of anger can be seen in the distortion of face and demeanor which were external signs of the ugliness that anger imposed on the spirt.There were those who argued that anger was a virtue in that it impelled action against injustice Seneca disagreed since duty impelled action and anger tended to make appropriate action excessive or misguided The good man will carry out his duties without fear or tumoil he ll act in a manner worthy of a good man such that he ll do nothing unworthy of a man My father is being killed I ll defend him He has been killed I ll avenge but beause it s right, not because I m grieved In addition, a person should seek tranquility and peace, not anger, which enmeshed the individual in a cycle of mindless revenge and counter revenge Life is short enough as it is for it to be spent in this way In one passage, Seneca used the image of a bull and bear tied together and baited to fight, all the while there waited a man with a sword at the ready to end the life of the winner of this contest.Seneca offers a variety of solutions for the problem of anger Delay is the greatest remedy for anger Waiting a bit to let the emotions cool off a bit will permit a calmer assessment of the facts So will humility since it is often the case that pride causes anger over perceived or real slights In any event, slights are often, in retrospect, hardly sufficient to get angry about Don t take on too much since people who are stressed easily succumb to anger Let the reading of poetry calm them and the reading of history amuse them with its stories Practice a studied ignorance It is not to your benefit to see and hear everything A final suggestion was to practice a pact of mutual leniency Who is there who is perfect and has never done anything wrong or given offense Certainly not one of us can say this about ourselves, so when someone does something to slight us, remind oneself that just as we need leniency, we should give leniency My personal favorite aphorism that I often have resort to is from St Ephraim the Syrian Be merciful for everyone is fighting a great battle This is a quick read I think it is better than most self help books you can find