{READ EPUB} Î The Edge of Memory: Ancient Stories, Oral Tradition and the Post-Glacial World ì eBook or E-pub free

Patrick Nunn has collected oral traditions mainly about rising sea levels at the end of the last ice age and geological natural disasters, but also about extinct animals from around the world We can see when the last tsunami, eruption, or sea level change happened by direct evidence, and so get an estimate of how long these stories have been passed down And the answer he arrives at is, a VERY long time Nunn proposes that oral transmission has frequently kept a memory alive of things that Patrick Nunn has collected oral traditions mainly about rising sea levels at the end of the last ice age and geological natural disasters, but also about extinct animals from around the world We can see when the last tsunami, eruption, or sea level change happened by direct evidence, and so get an estimate of how long these stories have been passed down And the answer he arrives at is, a VERY long time Nunn proposes that oral transmission has frequently kept a memory alive of things that happened over 10,000 years ago I m willing to grant that it may be possible, but I feel like he doesn t give sufficient consideration of the alternatives Maybe people who see artifacts when the tide goes out naturally make up stories of when the land was not flooded Maybe everyone, everywhere, has stories of gods that live on mountains and throw fire because those are big, scary things and we only take note when there happens to be a volcano nearby Maybe Australian indigenous people are making up stories about the cave paintings they see, rather than passing down a true story about them Suppose the story was told from a 65 year old grandmother to a 15 year old child each time That means that to get through 10,000 years, you would have to preserve the story through 200 retellings It s not impossible, but I know a little about how fairy tales have been transmitted, and while a few plot points persist, the oldest known version of the Cinderella story is pretty different from the Disney version Anyway, I felt like I needed stronger evidence for the claims and stronger evidence against the alternatives to be convinced It also makes me wonder what it tells us about the oral transmission of Genesis and Exodus The story of the Flood, especially Suppose ancient people built most their settlements right along the seacoasts to catch shellfish or whatever Then when the glaciers melted, every village in the world would have been flooded There really was a world wide flood It was just really slow motion in most places My interest in aboriginal rock art started when I was putting together an art project for primary school students on Mural Paintings It sparked my interest and an eventual trip to Australia to gather firsthand experiences Fast forward to 2018 and I am running an event for the Brisbane Writers Festival where Patrick Nunn is launching this book The oldest peoples in the world have stories to tell that have been largely ignored by western science because they haven t been written down But the My interest in aboriginal rock art started when I was putting together an art project for primary school students on Mural Paintings It sparked my interest and an eventual trip to Australia to gather firsthand experiences Fast forward to 2018 and I am running an event for the Brisbane Writers Festival where Patrick Nunn is launching this book The oldest peoples in the world have stories to tell that have been largely ignored by western science because they haven t been written down But these Indigenous peoples , he writes, have preserved..stories for perhapsthan 10 millennia And these stories are increasingly supported by hard science.It s a must read for geologists, sociologists, artists and anyone studying folk tradition 5 5 The first chapter of his autobiographical Meetings with Remarkable Men G I Gurdjieff describes his father, a professional storyteller who retold stories he d learned from his father who d learned them from his father etc and one of those stories G I recognised years later as being the Epic of Gilgamesh , a tale dated to about 2,100 BCE but only rediscovered and introduced to the West in about 1870, long after G I s father had been telling the tale This was an example of how, in pre li The first chapter of his autobiographical Meetings with Remarkable Men G I Gurdjieff describes his father, a professional storyteller who retold stories he d learned from his father who d learned them from his father etc and one of those stories G I recognised years later as being the Epic of Gilgamesh , a tale dated to about 2,100 BCE but only rediscovered and introduced to the West in about 1870, long after G I s father had been telling the tale This was an example of how, in pre literate societies, knowledge was preserved by human memory and faithfully transmitted orally for 10s, even 100s of generations, that I expected this book to cover In part, it did, starting with an account, attributing the events to gods, of the volcanic eruption that resulted in Crater Lake in the American state of Oregon, and dated by modern geological techniques to about 7,600 years ago.The book went on to recount a large number of oral legends of sudden sea level rise which flooded areas of previously dry land and that included references to hills, islands and the like which match geological features on the ocean floor in the said localities The number of such legends which correspond to geological features is astounding Although some other legendary accounts of sea level rise were cited, most of the accounts were those told by Australian Aborigines recorded by Europeans who made contact with them as Australia was settled although curiously omitted was an account of Aborigines in what was to become Melbourne relating that there had been a waterfall where Port Philip Bay meets the Southern Ocean cited by Geoffrey Blainey in his A Shorter History of Australia The book then went on to correlate the determined level of sea level rise with that calculated by geologists to date the events described in the said legends which were thus determined to be in the order of 8,000 to 10,000 years ago.All well and good, but the problem I had with this book was its focus Ostensibly a book about the preservation and reliable oral transmission of knowledge in pre literate societies, the focus of the book then shifted to legendary accounts of lost past sudden rises of sea level and of these accounts, it was largely focussed on accounts recounted by Australian Aboriginies A lot of detailed and interesting material was presented, but it would appear that the author had a difficulty deciding what was to be the focus of the book which shifted at least twice as it was put together Serious editing would have turned a book presenting great material into a great book Impressive in the detail the author has brought together But then the detail overwhelms and the thread of the argument becomes hard to follow.Words like plausible and likely are scattered like confetti through the earlier chapters The plausible becomes a given far too often.Nunn tackles an interesting topic that has engaged the attention of people for generations with an attractive enthusiasm, writing a speculative book clogged by detail and posing a little too breathlessly as rigorous.My fell Impressive in the detail the author has brought together But then the detail overwhelms and the thread of the argument becomes hard to follow.Words like plausible and likely are scattered like confetti through the earlier chapters The plausible becomes a given far too often.Nunn tackles an interesting topic that has engaged the attention of people for generations with an attractive enthusiasm, writing a speculative book clogged by detail and posing a little too breathlessly as rigorous.My fellow book group members found it very hard to stick with.I would like to believe the general thrust of Nunn s linking of myth like stories and legends with geological facts and I do believe there are elements of truth in the linkage.Just to give one example of where I remain unconvinced about his dating of some stories with some phenomena, he explores sea level raise and indigenous stories without considering the enormous tidal range in north Western Australia.It is a pity that his exploration was unable to include work from Africa long settled by humans and South American,recently settled, for comparison with Australia, Europe and India There are stories there too.I want to be convinced by the big picture, but the fine detail does not convince Interesting look at pre literate societies and their storiesI found this book interesting It tries to match ancient spoken stories to geologic and climatic events and to claim that these stories are a good source of information for looking at these events Author Patrick Nunn is a good writer and I enjoyed his writing style and the way he tried to make his case I did think that a lot of what he proposes is speculative and I appreciated his non dogmatic way of presenting his thesis At a minimu Interesting look at pre literate societies and their storiesI found this book interesting It tries to match ancient spoken stories to geologic and climatic events and to claim that these stories are a good source of information for looking at these events Author Patrick Nunn is a good writer and I enjoyed his writing style and the way he tried to make his case I did think that a lot of what he proposes is speculative and I appreciated his non dogmatic way of presenting his thesis At a minimum, it is a good book about human migration and pre literate society and is worth reading Disclosure I received a complimentary copy of this book via Netgalley for review purposes This great book marshals an impressive set of carefully collected evidence to argue the new and previously controversial claim that traditional societies all over the world have faithfully and remarkably accurately in some cases preserved the memory of ancient occurrences like tsunamis, volcanic eruptions and sea level change over many thousands of years over 10000 years in some cases for Indigenous Australia Professor Nunn is a careful scientist so anyone wanting to dispute his claims will This great book marshals an impressive set of carefully collected evidence to argue the new and previously controversial claim that traditional societies all over the world have faithfully and remarkably accurately in some cases preserved the memory of ancient occurrences like tsunamis, volcanic eruptions and sea level change over many thousands of years over 10000 years in some cases for Indigenous Australia Professor Nunn is a careful scientist so anyone wanting to dispute his claims will need an equally impressing grasp of scientific methods of data collection, analysis and interpretation There are some wonderful and unexpected finding presented here Highly recommended In this absolutely fascinating look at the way humans use oral traditions to preserve knowledge, Nunn, with a particular focus on Precolonial Australia, writes with a fluid and conversational style, matching historical projections and geological data with sacred stories from around the continent and across the world to answer the question how much is there that we might not realise we remember I have always believed that our oral tradition stories were founded on true events I love to be found right in this assumption I can still recall a very hostile 6th grade teacher telling us much of what we began to hear was just so much nonsense Hooray for the scientists, anthropologists, and others for proving what we knew all Along There is just so much to learn I received a Kindle arc from Netgalley in exchange for a fair review. {READ EPUB} Ç The Edge of Memory: Ancient Stories, Oral Tradition and the Post-Glacial World ì In The Edge of Memory, Patrick Nunn explores the science in folk history He looks at ancient tales and traditions that may be rooted in scientifically verifiable fact, and can be explored via geological evidence, such as the Biblical FloodWe all know those stories that have been told in our families for generations The ones that start Have I ever told you about your great, great Uncle In some cultures these stories have been passed down for thousands of years, and often reveal significant information about how the surrounding environment has changed and the effect it has had on societies from stories referring to coastal drowning to the devastation caused by meteorite fallsTake Australian folklore, for instance People arrived in Australia than , years ago, and the need to survive led to the development of knowledge that was captured orally in stories passed down through the generations These stories conveyed both practical information and recorded history, and they frequently made reference to a coastline that was very different to the one we recognize today In at leastdifferent communities along the fringe of Australia, flood stories were recorded by European anthropologists, missionaries, and others They described a lost landscape that is now under as much asfeet of ocean And these folk traditions are backed up by hard science Geologists are now starting to corroborate the tales through study of climatic data, sediments and land forms the evidence was there in the stories, but until recently, nobody was listening The Edge of Memory is an important book that explores the wider implications for our knowledge of how human society has developed through the millennia The Four-Dimensional Human Oral Tradition and the Post-Glacial World ì In The Edge of Memory Tell No Tales (DI Zigic and DS Ferreira, Patrick Nunn explores the science in folk history He looks at ancient tales and traditions that may be rooted in scientifically verifiable fact Bodies and can be explored via geological evidence Spiderweb such as the Biblical FloodWe all know those stories that have been told in our families for generations The ones that start Have I ever told you about your great The Gorilla Hunters great Uncle In some cultures these stories have been passed down for thousands of years The Devouring (The Devouring, and often reveal significant information about how the surrounding environment has changed and the effect it has had on societies from stories referring to coastal drowning to the devastation caused by meteorite fallsTake Australian folklore Sun and Shadow (Inspector Winter, for instance People arrived in Australia than Istoria codurilor secrete years ago The Uncrowned Queen (War of the Roses, and the need to survive led to the development of knowledge that was captured orally in stories passed down through the generations These stories conveyed both practical information and recorded history The Echo Chamber and they frequently made reference to a coastline that was very different to the one we recognize today In at leastdifferent communities along the fringe of Australia Byron Easy flood stories were recorded by European anthropologists Roommates missionaries The Reckoning (Ancient Guardians and others They described a lost landscape that is now under as much asfeet of ocean And these folk traditions are backed up by hard science Geologists are now starting to corroborate the tales through study of climatic data The Ultimate Barbie sediments and land forms the evidence was there in the stories The Mark and the Void but until recently Immortal Bad Boys nobody was listening The Edge of Memory is an important book that explores the wider implications for our knowledge of how human society has developed through the millennia Written communication is quite recent Oral communication has been used for much longer to pass knowledge from generation to generation.It looks like this book s purpose is to glorify the oral communication in passing knowledge, and how we underestimate it, and how we felt superior in replacing it with modern ways writing.I m not really sure where it s heading to There are a lot of historian considerations Maybe a long read for a few insights