~Epub ♾ The Collected Stories of Arthur C. Clarke ♷ PDF or E-pub free

~Epub ♵ The Collected Stories of Arthur C. Clarke ⚐ Author ofA Space Odyssey, Childhood s End, The City and the Stars, and the Hugo and Nebula Award winning Rendezvous with Rama, Arthur C Clarke is the most celebrated science fiction author alive He is with H G Wells, Isaac Asimov, and Robert A Heinlein one of the writers who define science fiction in our time Now Clarke has cooperated in the preparation of a massive, definitive edition of his collected shorter works From early work like Rescue Party and The Lion of Comarre, through classics like The Star, Earthlight, The Nine Billion Names of God, and The Sentinel kernel of the later novel, and movie,A Space Odyssey , all the way to later work like A Meeting with Medusa and The Hammer of God, this immense volume encapsulates one of the great SF careers of all time Paul Graham Childhood s End de Interrogationibus Obliquis Apud Ciceronem Observationes Selectae The City and the Stars A Trip to the Zoo and the Hugo and Nebula Award winning Rendezvous with Rama Las mejores anécdotas del Barça (Deportes) Arthur C Clarke is the most celebrated science fiction author alive He is with H G Wells To Love Again (Bound Hearts Isaac Asimov All He Needed and Robert A Heinlein one of the writers who define science fiction in our time Now Clarke has cooperated in the preparation of a massive A Christmas to Remember definitive edition of his collected shorter works From early work like Rescue Party and The Lion of Comarre Step In through classics like The Star The Amazing Hairstyles Book Earthlight Le destin funeste de Michael Rockefeller The Nine Billion Names of God Prinzipien in der Philosophie and The Sentinel kernel of the later novel The Vampire Diaries and movie,A Space Odyssey The Bodies Just Keep Piling Up all the way to later work like A Meeting with Medusa and The Hammer of God Frida Kahlo And Diego Rivera this immense volume encapsulates one of the great SF careers of all time LATEST STORY REVIEW UPDATE Story 15Transience.15 Transience 1949 5 pages 4.5 Stars A story that expresses that mankind is here for only a short span of time, temporarily Man has come, and shall be gone, in the grand scheme of thingsJune 16, 2015 14 History Lesson 1949 7 pages 5 Stars Five Thousand years after the Third Planet has lost its civilization due to an Ice Age, the now progressed Venusians venture forth towards it, to learn the past of an advanced species The s LATEST STORY REVIEW UPDATE Story 15Transience.15 Transience 1949 5 pages 4.5 Stars A story that expresses that mankind is here for only a short span of time, temporarily Man has come, and shall be gone, in the grand scheme of thingsJune 16, 2015 14 History Lesson 1949 7 pages 5 Stars Five Thousand years after the Third Planet has lost its civilization due to an Ice Age, the now progressed Venusians venture forth towards it, to learn the past of an advanced species The story teaches us a lesson, on the limits of learning the truth from historical researchJune 15, 2015 13 Nightfall 1947 3 pages 4 Stars The last nuclear weapon explodes, mankind is annihilated, as the river takes its own new courseJune 14, 2015 12 Inheritance 1947 7 pages 3 Stars When a dream that drives one man s destiny forwardCNC RR June 14, 2015 11 The Fires Within 1947 7 pages 4 Stars When sonar research is being developed as a means of geological surveying, what the researchers find is beyond our capabilities to understand as to howNov 8, 2014 10 Castaway 1947 6 pages 5 Stars When an unusual ionised life form from the photosphere of the sun drops into the Atlantic ocean on a planet now called as the Earth, it is aeons later when it is faced with a radiation so powerful indeed which gives rise to its threat of annihilationOct 4, 2014 9 Technical Error 1946 13 pages 4.5 Stars When the world s first superconductive generator goes awry, a man is found subjected to the yet unknown rules of lateral inversion Superb use of the idea of stereo isomerism in a short story that I could have never thought of so easilyJuly 17, 2014 8 Rescue Party 1946 21 pages 4.5 Stars Alveron and his kind, the lords of the Universe, approach Earth to rescue any survivors due to their sun about to become Nova in a few hours The Paladorian, possessing no self identity but still connected with an unknown link to its fellow kinds who are scattered around the galaxy, is my personal favourite This story involves some good mysteryMay 21, 2014 7 Loophole 1946 6 pages 5 Stars In an epistolary form, Clarke describes Martians trying to suppress Mankind from achieving a technology and how that leads to an eventually much powerful expression of man s potential to harness the laws of physics, displaying a certainty of loopholes in any system The causes of the end of WW2 are reflected at the beginning of this storyMar 27, 2014 6 Whacky 1942 2 pages 4 Stars This one took four rounds of reading in order for me to comprehend as much Highly speculative, the story I can say can be interpreted in various ways while including elements of Dreams, a Creator and Pre Birth, Astral Travel, or even Death Horror takes its own form when the reader s thinking mind is much into the ideas behind the writing of this storyMar 26, 2014 5 The Awakening 1942 3 pages 5 Stars For a man waiting to be awakened from a tomb after hundred years for a treatment to cure his heart, the repercussions of what he sees upon his awakening, remains a terrorizing idea by itself The story is food for further science fictional thinkingMar 26, 2014 4 Reverie 1939 2 pages 3 Stars A short essay on All the ideas in Science Fiction have been used upMar 26, 2014 3 Retreat from Earth 1938 9 pages 5 Stars Earth like Martians plan on occupying the mankind inhabited Third planet, which has already been occupied by extra terrestrial creatures from millions of years ago that live amongst us in real life even to this day Terrific detailing of the alien form and its social structureMar 25, 2014 2 How We Went to Mars 1938 8 pages 3.5 Stars A group of people build a rocket based spaceship in the relative future, towards the late 1940 s, to be amongst the first ones to blast off into further space The group ends up travelling to Mars, and their adventures are described in the story Containshumour than the preceding storyMar 11, 2014 1 Travel By Wire 1937 4 pages 4.0 Stars In which they engage in the creation of a wired transporter teleporter , and explain in short the various difficulties and mishaps that follow its invention and wide use Contains a bit of humourMar 10, 2014CNC Could Not Comprehend at all CNC RR Could Not Comprehend well A Re Reading is required 5.0 stars I have not read all of the stories in the massive collection, but I have read The Star 5.o stars 9 Billions Names for God 5.0 stars The Sentinel 5.0 stars. A collection of stories of Arthur C Clarke, in chronological order from the early 40 s until his death in 2000.As part of the Big Three in sciencefiction, Arthur C Clarke has left us an extensive oeuvre In this book all his short stories are assembled and it gives a good overview of the themes that he used The exploration and conquest of the solar system and the stars is mixed with evolution of the humans and its place amongst the stars All in all, for someone with a taste for sciencefictio A collection of stories of Arthur C Clarke, in chronological order from the early 40 s until his death in 2000.As part of the Big Three in sciencefiction, Arthur C Clarke has left us an extensive oeuvre In this book all his short stories are assembled and it gives a good overview of the themes that he used The exploration and conquest of the solar system and the stars is mixed with evolution of the humans and its place amongst the stars All in all, for someone with a taste for sciencefiction, a must read.According to the author Science fiction is something that could happen but usually you wouldn t want it to Fantasy is something that couldn t happen though often you only wish that it could I nearly finished the first two volumes and then had to stop for my exams Intend to start all over again in the future.I liked most of the stories I ve read so far but Retreat from Earth 1938 and Breaking Strain 1949 , both in Vol.1, are among my all time favourites. This is a near chronological collection of the stories of the late Sir Arthur C Clarke 1917 2008 Clarke was considered one of the big three of science fiction writers during the golden age of the genre, the other two were Isaac Asimov and Robert Heinlein He s credited with inspiring the idea of using satellites to relay information and, of course, wrote the screenplay of 2001 A Space Odyssey I tried to read this book last summer and just wasn t in the right mental place for it Part of This is a near chronological collection of the stories of the late Sir Arthur C Clarke 1917 2008 Clarke was considered one of the big three of science fiction writers during the golden age of the genre, the other two were Isaac Asimov and Robert Heinlein He s credited with inspiring the idea of using satellites to relay information and, of course, wrote the screenplay of 2001 A Space Odyssey I tried to read this book last summer and just wasn t in the right mental place for it Part of the problem is that before WWII Clarke was in his teens and writing fan fiction for small British sci fi venues They re definitely not his best work, but going through them this time I was better able to pay attention to his growth as a writer.So in these stories you ll often find nuggets of later works There is an early version of Childhood s End, the novel in which earth gives control to an alien race that remains hidden for years, only their voices available, because they know their appearance is similar to depictions of Satan There is also a story that he recycled into the extended version of 2001 These are interesting looks at his development and process It s also easy to spot some of the odd tricks he would use Many of the early stories, and a few later ones, turn to O Henry type surprise endings He was especially fond of a kind of context switch where I m telling the story so you think it s about A when it s actually about B One example is a story about a discussion on the odd behaviors of aliens on a newly discovered planet In the last few lines it s clear these are aliens talking about us Clarke was fond of humorous stories, and this book includes his Tales of the White Hart stories in which a group of friends gathers in a pub called The White Hart and tell long, convoluted stories on one theme or another Or there s the story of alien beings who try to send a psychic message to humanity warning that the sun will soon go nova but that the aliens can save us It s unfortunate that the only person they can connect with psychically is a depressed drunk who forgets the message the next morning.Many of the stories are also very much of their time Until we were able to send probes to various planets, or were able to takesensitive telescopic measurements of the chemical makeup of planetary atmosphere, we could only guess what was in our own solar system Thus there was the regular thought that Venus was a place of constant rain with possible alien life forms not the superheated rock surrounded by poison gases we know it to be now There was also the assumption that Mars either supported or had supported in the pastaliens It took our own science to inform us how alone we really are in the light of our sun.But then there s a really brilliant story about Jupiter being explored in a craft piloted by a man who had been injured and is now half mechanical and half human He lowers his craft into the stormy clouds of Jupiter to find creatures made of bubbles and as large as three football fields, these chased by manta like creatures that glide through the storms As he leaves the planet the man runs through the thought that he is half machine and half human, a halfway point between humanity and what humanity will become.Not overtly political Clarke is still a humanist and generally an optimist There are only a few dystopian futures in these stories Most are sometimes flawed humans continuing their push to explore space Even Russians are treated as decent people, this from a cold war era author This is the kind of book you can take on in small bites I m all for using short story volumes to fill time on bus rides and coffee breaks This, however, is really a book that should be plowed through to get a sense of the life work of an influential author It s especially interesting to read some of Clarke s own notes on what inspired the stories or why they were solicited from publishers in his later years Science fiction writers and fans will see the seed ideas for later tropes used throughout the genre, as well as his eventual understanding that character drives good fiction and the rest is just decoration Important and thrilling decoration but decoration all the same They are also informed by his education in mathematics and physics, while they re fed by his own love of the science fiction genre It s weird that my first book of 2020 should be a 966 page volume but for the record I was reading it for most of December I love Clarke s short stories I grew up on them and it was a pleasure to read so many of them all at once It s interesting that a lot of the truly great ones The Sentinel , The Star , The Nine Billion Names of God , Venture to the Moon are all very early on He becomes less prodigiously prolific with time so the last ten or so stories cover 1970 2000, and none It s weird that my first book of 2020 should be a 966 page volume but for the record I was reading it for most of December I love Clarke s short stories I grew up on them and it was a pleasure to read so many of them all at once It s interesting that a lot of the truly great ones The Sentinel , The Star , The Nine Billion Names of God , Venture to the Moon are all very early on He becomes less prodigiously prolific with time so the last ten or so stories cover 1970 2000, and none of the late ones really stand out save perhaps Dial F for Frankenstein , which seems derivative only because Clarke did it first.Random observations of course, Clarke s vision of the future is vastly dated like Asimov, he seemed to think computers would get bigger and bigger, not smaller and he really thought Mars was just around the corner after the Moon Famously, he understood technological change but not social change his stories set in far distant futures or even jolly old 2020 have fifties nuclear families and social s He is spectacularly, catastrophically sexist Across nearly a thousand pages I spotted exactly one story with a main character who is an adult woman whose role in the story is not to be a foil to a man Mostly, they re sexist by omission it s the White Hart stories, the shaggy dog story style stories from the mid fifities, that I found shockingly, appallingly misogynist If you want to skip one in this collection, make it The Defenestration of Ermintrude Inch.That said if you can put that aside it s hard not to feel a lot of affection for his warm and loving stories set in an optimistic Golden Age And while I am not qualified to comment on Clarke as a queer writer of SF in his historical context, he was a queer SF writer, and possibly the most influential of all time I m pleased to know it Included stories Travel by Wire How We Went to MarsRetreat From EarthReverieThe AwakeningWhackyLoopholeRescue PartyTechnical ErrorCastawayThe Fires WithinInheritanceNightfallHistory LessonTransienceThe Wall of DarknessThe Lion of ComarreThe Forgotten EnemyHide and SeekBreaking StrainNemesisGuardian AngelTime s ArrowA Walk in the DarkSilence PleaseTrouble With the NativesThe Road to the SeaThe SentinelHoliday on the MoonEarthlightSecond DawnSuperiority If I Forget Thee, Oh Earth All the Time i Included stories Travel by Wire How We Went to MarsRetreat From EarthReverieThe AwakeningWhackyLoopholeRescue PartyTechnical ErrorCastawayThe Fires WithinInheritanceNightfallHistory LessonTransienceThe Wall of DarknessThe Lion of ComarreThe Forgotten EnemyHide and SeekBreaking StrainNemesisGuardian AngelTime s ArrowA Walk in the DarkSilence PleaseTrouble With the NativesThe Road to the SeaThe SentinelHoliday on the MoonEarthlightSecond DawnSuperiority If I Forget Thee, Oh Earth All the Time in the WorldThe Nine Billion Names of GodThe PossessedThe ParasiteJupiter FiveEncounter In the DawnThe Other TigerPublicity CampaignArmaments RaceThe Deep RangeNo Morning AfterBig Game HuntPatent PendingRefugeeThe StarWhat Goes UpVenture to the MoonThe PacifistThe Reluctant OrchidMoving SpiritThe Defenestration of Ermintrude InchThe Ultimate MelodyThe Next TenantsCold WarSleeping BeautySecurity CheckThe Man Who Ploughed the SeaCritical MassThe Other Side of the SkyLet There Be LightOut of the SunCosmic CasanovaThe Songs of Distant EarthA Slight Case of SunstrokeWho s There Out of the Cradle, Endlessly OrbitingI Remember BabylonTrouble With TimeInto the CometSummertime on IcarusSaturn RisingDeath and the SenatorBefore EdenHateLove that UniverseDog StarMaelstrom IIAn Ape About the HouseThe Shining OnesThe SecretDial F For FrankensteinThe Wind from the SunThe Food of the GodsThe Last CommandLight of DarknessThe Longest Science fiction Story Ever ToldPlaybackThe Cruel SkyHerbert George Morley Roberts Wells, Esq CrusadeNeutron TideReunionsTransit of EarthA Meeting With MedusaQuarantine siseneG The Steam powered Word ProcessorOn Golden SeasThe Hammer of GodThe Wire ContinuumImproving the Neighbourhood If you re into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Trove of Clarke s Goodies The Collected Stories by Arthur C ClarkeThere are many early 20th century writers whose SF and fantasy continue to be read today.The very successful literary writer James Branch Cabell would find half his novels categorized as fantasy today, including his most famous, J rgen Though he predates the period, the equally talented Robert Chambers was an excellent literary fantasist his book the King in Yellow If you re into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Trove of Clarke s Goodies The Collected Stories by Arthur C ClarkeThere are many early 20th century writers whose SF and fantasy continue to be read today.The very successful literary writer James Branch Cabell would find half his novels categorized as fantasy today, including his most famous, J rgen Though he predates the period, the equally talented Robert Chambers was an excellent literary fantasist his book the King in Yellow had vast influence over the 20th century weird fiction sub genre including the lesser writer H P Lovecraft whose works are still enormously influential If you re a SF fan and I have to explain to you who Arthur C Clarke is, then this may be the greatest gift anyone can give you beyond a time machine that will take you back in time to explain who Arthur C Clarke is to your past self so that when I ask you about him in the future you don t give me a blank look and I don t subsequently make fun of you It s nice that one book can prevent all that.When you come up with a short list of SF authors that pretty much defined the genre back when it was s If you re a SF fan and I have to explain to you who Arthur C Clarke is, then this may be the greatest gift anyone can give you beyond a time machine that will take you back in time to explain who Arthur C Clarke is to your past self so that when I ask you about him in the future you don t give me a blank look and I don t subsequently make fun of you It s nice that one book can prevent all that.When you come up with a short list of SF authors that pretty much defined the genre back when it was starting to codify into an actual genre and not just a series of weird stories that sometimes involved aliens coming to Earth to steal their women, most people will include Asimov and Heinlein and Clarke And while all three had their successes, Clarke seemed to stake out a nice clear eyed middle ground between Asimov s thoughtful slabs of ice water and Heinlein s quick tales of pluck and radical derring do, relaying an optimistic view of the future that didn t shy away from the new dangers that would have to be faced but balancing all the far flung science with a humanistic bent that kept it grounded in a reality that just happened to include spaceships and aliens And while his best known works are probably novels Childhood s End , Rendezvous With Rama , 2001 , The Fountains of Paradise , he also wrote an incredible number of short stories over the course of his extremely long career, many of which acted as staging grounds to be expanded into novels.This collection, probably the only Clarke short story collection you will ever need, contains over a hundred of his short stories, from his first in 1937 to the first SF story published in Nature magazine in 1999 There are probably omissions here and there and some of those omissions might be someone s favorite but for the most part all the hits are here, and quite a bitbesides While some people complained about rampant typos, I didn t noticethan a few here and there and considering how many short story collections you d have to acquire to get all this, it s probably safe to say that it s essential.One of the interesting things to note is that out of the whole, there are very few duffers in the bunch, implying that he was remarkably consistent over the course of his career, even if not all of them hit with the same impact Another thing to note is how his style falls into place fairly early and really doesn t change too much over the course of the decades, there are very few radical leaps into experimentation one late story plays with format slightly, and not completely successfully and his prose remains amazingly clear and functional, never delving into pure robotic conveyance but only rarely making the leaps into pure poetry that his contemporaries were sometimes capable of.What sets Clarke apart for me is his vision of the future Without staking out a formal Future History like Asimov and Heinlein and others did, he posits a future that ranges from the twenty first century to centuries later that speak of a calm optimism, a sense of mundane wonder where travels between planets and visits to the stars are commonplace, where even the dangers have an aura of Wow, how is that possible about them, where contact with aliens is a cause for a leap forward, and contemplation He creates futures that you want to live in and puts people in the jobs we can see ourselves doing, stripping them of heroics and turning them into amazing experiences that are still all in a day s work With Clarke, you feel the stillnesses between the stars and the gritty winds of Mars, the quiet hum of a functional space ship, and the groaning tick of rapidly dwindling time when it s clear the universe isn t waiting for you In a present where fiction seems to be fascinated by psychological distortions or formal rules breaking, his stories are a call back to a time when it seemed like the future was a vast country that held nothing but infinite possibilities if handled right and we weren t on a one way trip to Dystopia ville thoughthan one story features aliens assuming that we re a threat to everything and wiping us out He s straightforward and tricky at the same time, earnest but never cloying, insistent that technology can help us reach that future while never forgetting that it depends on the people managing it.His bread and butter stories seem to involve people dealing with new technologies or encountering problems specific to the future and forced to use their wits or rely on luck to get them out of the jam a man stuck on the hot side of an asteroid, another trapped in a ship that is going to orbit straight into the surface of the moon , their plights dependent on us buying the context of their well sketched and grounded future, a place where anything could happen, even the bad stuff But in Clarke s stories, the nimble mind can always find a way out.For me, his best stories involve an underlying spirituality that is basedon wonder at the workings of the universe than a faith in any specific god he didn t subscribe to any religion , something that suggests that God is in the details and that the universe is a farfascinating place that we can ever imagine, even with the assistance of a higher power The Nine Billion Names of God most notably, both serious and playful about the concept His stories nod toward history not in the sense of what we see in our lifetimes but the slow drift of evolution Guardian Angel , the kernel of what would later become Childhood s End and in that sense set him apart from hisserious minded colleagues, who tended to be about all science all the timeClarke never dove completely into the paranormal but was clearly fascinated by all that we could never understand.In that sense, this tome is full of riches, from the aforementioned stories to the lyrical gems like The Distant Songs of Earth and a host of classics too many to name If there s any quibble it s that there s almost too much to digest here and it s best taken in small doses, especially since while his subject matter varies wildly, a lot of the stories are often written in a Twilight Zone type format, presenting a scenario and then upending it with a conclusion that brings an unexpected twist to the proceedings the White Hart tales, while clever, also seem to be somewhat endless in number and after what feels like the fiftieth one in a row you may find yourself begging for mercy, even if in a minor fashion Later in his life he seemsconcerned with the Earth falling to pieces, but he never loses sight of the future as a place that we can all live in, that we re living in every day While some of the predictions here as much as they are predictions and not just dramatic license can come across as dated, especially the stuff about the other planets in the solar system and you also start to wish for a female lead character, as it s a boy s club with a few rare exceptions one thing the stories never come across as is hokey No matter what era they re written in, Clarke s voice keeps them from achieving the corn that so many of his peers were unable to shake and while some of the science dates the era of the tales as well as all the Cold War concerns, though Clarke was also daring enough to depict the Russians in a sympathetic light , the tales themselves achieve an odd timelessness At times Clarke seems to be trying to write the future he wanted to see, all the while understanding that if he wouldn t be around to see it then he could bring it about for us by inspiring us to see the stars asthan twinkling points of light, understanding as less an obstacle anda goal, and the space between planets as no different than the spaces between each other,fascinating the closer you get and fraught with challenges that both must overcome for progress to occur, and a trajectory that bends ever upward if only we never lose sight of what it means to be truly boundless