|DOWNLOAD ☱ Alone Against the North: An Expedition into the Unknown ♆ eBooks or Kindle ePUB free

Loved the subject, loved the story Shoalts account of it, however, comes across as immature and narcissistic His main literary device seems to be building himself up by making everyone else in the book appear as bumbling, less skilled, less courageous, less determined, less knowledgeable.you get the picture He even manages to make his own father seem inferior I thought perhaps that I was reading too much into his narrative but then I saw him on TV and heard him speak at an event There s Loved the subject, loved the story Shoalts account of it, however, comes across as immature and narcissistic His main literary device seems to be building himself up by making everyone else in the book appear as bumbling, less skilled, less courageous, less determined, less knowledgeable.you get the picture He even manages to make his own father seem inferior I thought perhaps that I was reading too much into his narrative but then I saw him on TV and heard him speak at an event There s an arrogance and a lack of grace about him that makes him inaccessible a shame because what he does is pretty incredible and I d like to hearabout it But I d like to readabout the subject matter and not his mastery over it The fact that he s a skilled woodsman and explorer is a given That s why we re reading the book We don t need to be reminded of it every 2nd paragraph I can t help but compare him to Les Stroud who, while not an Explorer a title Shoalts doesn t let us forget for long , does similar things and has comparable skills Stroud differs, thankfully, in that he is able to tell a story and educate without arrogance or condescension He s just a guy from Etobicoke who knows how to take care of himself A little bit of Stroud s humility might serve Shoalts well I ve only recently started to enjoy non fiction and they ve mostly been stories of outdoor expeditions, excursions, and life altering and enriching experiences This book I enjoyed all thebecause of its Canadian content I ve actually been to some of the northern Ontario cities referenced in the book and ridden the Polar Bear Express Enough of me This book was well written and I enjoyed learning some history I was unaware of Adam Shoalts has a love of adventure, the land, and a level of I ve only recently started to enjoy non fiction and they ve mostly been stories of outdoor expeditions, excursions, and life altering and enriching experiences This book I enjoyed all thebecause of its Canadian content I ve actually been to some of the northern Ontario cities referenced in the book and ridden the Polar Bear Express Enough of me This book was well written and I enjoyed learning some history I was unaware of Adam Shoalts has a love of adventure, the land, and a level of bravery not often seen I especially was both encouraged and saddened by the short afterward that reminds us all of our responsibility to take care of the land and the earth we have Good read There have been some complaints from readers about this author s ego complaints that the book is about him,than it is about the Canadian Wilderness But, perhaps, all great adventurers are somewhat self centred what could possibly make them risk their lives the way they do if not for some deep inner ego driven force They clearly do it, not so much for the knowledge gained but out of a compulsion for adventure their thirst for seeing what s around the next corner their thrill in riskin There have been some complaints from readers about this author s ego complaints that the book is about him,than it is about the Canadian Wilderness But, perhaps, all great adventurers are somewhat self centred what could possibly make them risk their lives the way they do if not for some deep inner ego driven force They clearly do it, not so much for the knowledge gained but out of a compulsion for adventure their thirst for seeing what s around the next corner their thrill in risking their lives, without thought of how that affects others In other words, they are not like you and me They carry an insatiable passion within and this passion benefits us all when they write books like this, detailing their adventures and those of other explorers before them An unfortunate side to the risk taker s adventurous and careless spirit is their inability to understand and have compassion for others who have less compulsion than them I found his somewhat derisive tone for his companion, Brent Kozah a bit harsh He claims they are still friends I wonder what Brent would have to say about that after his depiction in this book Adam Shoalts could have been a little kinder Nonetheless, this book was an exciting depiction of a great adventure and I thoroughly enjoyed it I received an advance copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways When I first received the book, I figured it would be a bit of a slog for me I vastly prefer fiction over non, am not even remotely an outdoorsy type, and thought the premise was perhaps a bit too thin to build a book upon A whole book about some guy canoeing in the Canadian wilderness It turned out to be a fabulous read The book was entertaining, at times humorous, intelligent, and educational The author and explorer is v I received an advance copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways When I first received the book, I figured it would be a bit of a slog for me I vastly prefer fiction over non, am not even remotely an outdoorsy type, and thought the premise was perhaps a bit too thin to build a book upon A whole book about some guy canoeing in the Canadian wilderness It turned out to be a fabulous read The book was entertaining, at times humorous, intelligent, and educational The author and explorer is very knowledgable about a number of subjects Canadian flora and fauna, history, wilderness survival, etc and weaves this into the telling of his story I often took breaks from the book to do additional research on the internet to supplement the reading The book itself was very descriptive and I often felt like I was right there with him while, at the same time, being greatly relieved that I was not This is the most selfish and self absorbed book I ve ever read Especially when it starts with I think I always knew I was destined to be an explorer Shoalts talks about no one other than himself His dad makes a cameo because he helps Shoalts fix build equipment, the guys who fly boat him in and out of places are mentioned, and he bad mouths the friends who go with him He just can t fathom why one of his friends wouldn t want to do a random canoe trip instead of being home while his wife is This is the most selfish and self absorbed book I ve ever read Especially when it starts with I think I always knew I was destined to be an explorer Shoalts talks about no one other than himself His dad makes a cameo because he helps Shoalts fix build equipment, the guys who fly boat him in and out of places are mentioned, and he bad mouths the friends who go with him He just can t fathom why one of his friends wouldn t want to do a random canoe trip instead of being home while his wife is pregnant, and the other friend he basically bad mouths for not being keen enough he knew beforehand that this friend could be a problem, so it s not the friend s fault, it s Shoalts s fault for not choosing his team wisely.I usually enjoy tales of adventure in remote areas of our country In this case Shoalts just succeeded in pissing me off with his condescension about adventurers vs explorers, his bad mouthing of journalists making minor mistakes that he likely could have prevented by speaking with themclearly , his slavish admiration for the many male explorers who went before him only one woman is mentioned, and that s because she s the wife of an explorer who aims to finish his last trip Also every quote at the beginning of each chapter is by men , and his pretentious wearing of a brown fedora which he loses twice and has to note how sad he is about it.He s also closely tied in with Canadian Geographic and the Royal Canadian Geographical Society When he gets elected as a Fellow of the RCGS, he s over the moon about how only real explorers get to join Dude, I m a member too And I worked in the High Arctic for four years You don t see me dancing around about what a great explorer I am because I ve been validated by the RCGS.He also talks about the devastation of remote wilderness by industry Well if he s really concerned about it, he might not want to be as entangled with CanGeo as he is, given their ties to oil and gas The story may have been interesting but the ego of the author and his constant running down of those around him really put me off It overshadowed the storyline for me and I wouldn t recommend it for that reason. |DOWNLOAD ♀ Alone Against the North: An Expedition into the Unknown ☮ The age of exploration is not over When Adam Shoalts ventured into the largest unexplored wilderness on the planet, he hoped to set foot where no one had ever gone before What he discovered surprised even him Shoalts was no stranger to the wilderness He had hacked his way through jungles and swamp, had stared down polar bears and climbed mountains But one spot on the map called out to him irresistibly the Hudson Bay Lowlands, a trackless expanse of muskeg and lonely rivers, caribou and wolf an of the north, parts of which to this day remain unexplored Cutting through this forbidding landscape is a river no explorer, trapper, or canoeist had left any record of paddling It was this river that Shoalts was obsessively determined to explore It took him several attempts, and years of research But finally, alone, he found the headwaters of the mysterious river He believed he had discovered what he had set out to find But the adventure had just begun Unexpected dangers awaited him downstream Gripping and often poetic, Alone Against the North is a classic adventure story of single minded obsession, physical hardship, and the restless sense of wonder that every explorer has in common But what does exploration mean in an age when satellite imagery of even the remotest corner of the planet is available to anyone with a phone Is there anything left to explore What Shoalts discovered as he paddled downriver was a series of unmapped waterfalls that could easily have killed him Just as astonishing was the media reaction when he got back to civilization He was crowned Canada s Indiana Jones and appeared on morning television He was feted by the Royal Canadian Geographical Society and congratulated by the Governor General People were enthralled by Shoalts s proof that the world is bigger than we think Shoalts s story makes it clear that the world can become known only by getting out of our cars and armchairs, and setting out into the unknown, where every step is different from the one before, and something you may never have imagined lies around the next curve in the river From the Hardcover edition Uptown Thief he hoped to set foot where no one had ever gone before What he discovered surprised even him Shoalts was no stranger to the wilderness He had hacked his way through jungles and swamp Little Butterfly Omnibus had stared down polar bears and climbed mountains But one spot on the map called out to him irresistibly the Hudson Bay Lowlands Seedlings of Barro Colorado Island and the Neotropics a trackless expanse of muskeg and lonely rivers سيمبلين (Cymbeline) caribou and wolf an of the north The Christmas Baby Bonus parts of which to this day remain unexplored Cutting through this forbidding landscape is a river no explorer The Making of a Sonnet: A Norton Anthology trapper Search the Seven Hills or canoeist had left any record of paddling It was this river that Shoalts was obsessively determined to explore It took him several attempts Blutsbrüder and years of research But finally Deutsche Märchen und Sagen alone Die Liebe, ein Speer und Creme brûlée he found the headwaters of the mysterious river He believed he had discovered what he had set out to find But the adventure had just begun Unexpected dangers awaited him downstream Gripping and often poetic The Homeland Directive Alone Against the North is a classic adventure story of single minded obsession Undone by the Sultan's Touch (Harlequin Presents) physical hardship Walter Rothschild: The Man, the Museum and the Menagerie and the restless sense of wonder that every explorer has in common But what does exploration mean in an age when satellite imagery of even the remotest corner of the planet is available to anyone with a phone Is there anything left to explore What Shoalts discovered as he paddled downriver was a series of unmapped waterfalls that could easily have killed him Just as astonishing was the media reaction when he got back to civilization He was crowned Canada s Indiana Jones and appeared on morning television He was feted by the Royal Canadian Geographical Society and congratulated by the Governor General People were enthralled by Shoalts s proof that the world is bigger than we think Shoalts s story makes it clear that the world can become known only by getting out of our cars and armchairs The Samurai's Daughter and setting out into the unknown Fragile Agileagile Softwareentwicklung Richtig Verstehen Und Leben where every step is different from the one before Belisarius: The Last Roman General and something you may never have imagined lies around the next curve in the river From the Hardcover edition This is an incredible account of a real life adventure story Adam writes with intelligence and humour, drawing the reader into a world of unbelievable isolation and formidable challenges Alone Against the North is impressive, engaging, and completely unique It would make a great documentary. The other 2 star reviews hit the nail on the head so I won t repeat them.What I will add is that as a hiker I enjoy setting up artificial challenges for myself that might lead me to hike a couple of extra miles or hit some arbitrary deadline For all the talk of the necessity of exploration and survival at all costs, I see this type of artificially inflated challenge figure prominently in Adam s adventures There is nothing wrong with this but for two things A he s outsourcing risk to his woul The other 2 star reviews hit the nail on the head so I won t repeat them.What I will add is that as a hiker I enjoy setting up artificial challenges for myself that might lead me to hike a couple of extra miles or hit some arbitrary deadline For all the talk of the necessity of exploration and survival at all costs, I see this type of artificially inflated challenge figure prominently in Adam s adventures There is nothing wrong with this but for two things A he s outsourcing risk to his would be rescuers, and B it conflicts with his insistence that his adventures are for the sake of exploration.Two cases in point spoilers If you review the map of his journey that he began with Brent, his original design that he shockingly did not thoroughly read Brent into before setting out was to portage 100 km over 2 weeks and explore the western tributary of the Brant River pages 66, 85, 93 His second plan relates to the nameless river and he sells it to Brent saying, We would have to travel upriver, against the current, wading through the water and dragging the canoe behind us for about a hundred and twenty kilometers 93 Evidently, Brent was not sold The third plan which they begin to pursue takes them down the Sutton River and then back up the Brant, but this plan was so dangerous that I was reluctant to mention it and yet Adam wasn t sure whether Brent understood what the plan I had sketched out involved exactly and I was in no mood to explain it 94 In my view, this is criminal as an outdoors companion and Adam should be ashamed rather than prideful of risking his friend s life without his informed consent I disgress Ultimately, when Brent leaves the trip, Adam executes plan 2 alone and drags his canoe upstream 120 km along the nameless river Apparently, the nameless river was a worthy target of exploration after all, even though it was his preference to explore the Brant River tributary However, if you inspect the map, the furthest upstream point he made on the nameless river is indeed 120 km upstream from the Goose Lodge, but it is also only 4 km from the point the plane dropped them on Hawley Lake with two lakes covering perhaps a third of that distance, and no especially challenging terrain that can be seen on satellite imagery So basically, he lies to his friend about the necessity of dragging their canoe upstream 120 km because that was the only version of the journey that was sufficiently hardcore for Adam It wasn t enough to canoe or explore the nameless river in a straightforward way at all, and also, I partly suspect that he wanted to scare Brent off as an excuse to be alone and increase the challenge and the scale of the tale he would have to tell.A secondminor case in point, he canoes the Again River finally and yet neglects to carry sufficient tools to effectively document his discovery, despite this apparently being the only distinction between explorer and adventurer So he must returnI m all for adventure and self challenge for their own sake, but spare me the preaching and talk of fate and necessity This book definitely grips you from the start, I found that I couldn t put the book down until I finished it I ve never read this type of book before, but I saw the author speak at Toronto s Word on the Street literary festival, and was intrigued Reading the book, I felt like I was walking right beside the author through every swamp and forest, his descriptions of Canada s vast wilderness are so clear The way he describes his encounters with wildlife such as bears, eagles and moose as well as This book definitely grips you from the start, I found that I couldn t put the book down until I finished it I ve never read this type of book before, but I saw the author speak at Toronto s Word on the Street literary festival, and was intrigued Reading the book, I felt like I was walking right beside the author through every swamp and forest, his descriptions of Canada s vast wilderness are so clear The way he describes his encounters with wildlife such as bears, eagles and moose as well as his experience with his surroundings make me love and fear the wilderness at the same time.Even though the Adam doesn t really delve into what he s feeling during every hurdle, you find yourself understanding how he feels regardless You feel like you re reading a non fiction versus a fiction because the book reads like a story I am the most impressed by this because most non fiction books i ve encountered tend to be dry I also really like how Adam incorporated historical tidbits that relate to his current position in his journey, so on top of reading a great story, I learnedabout history I would definitely recommend this to anyone who enjoys walking through the woods, watching reality TV on the discovery channel, or anyone interested in the exploration of Canada