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*Download E-pub õ Plague and Fire: Battling Black Death and the 1900 Burning of Honolulu's Chinatown ⛈ A little over a century ago, bubonic plague the same Black Death that decimated medieval Europe arrived on the shores of Hawaii just as the islands were about to become a U.S territory In this absorbing narrative, James Mohr tells the story of that fearful visitation and its fiery climax a vast conflagration that engulfed Honolulu s Chinatown Mohr tells this gripping tale largely through the eyes of the people caught up in the disaster, from members of the white elite to Chinese doctors, Japanese businessmen, and Hawaiian reporters At the heart of the narrative are three American physicians the Honolulu Board of Health who became virtual dictators when the government granted them absolute control over the armed forces and the treasury The doctors soon quarantined Chinatown, where the plague was killing one or two people a day and clearly spreading They resisted intense pressure from the white community to burn down all of Chinatown at once and instead ordered a careful, controlled burning of buildings where plague victims had died But a freak wind whipped one of those small fires into a roaring inferno that destroyed everything in its path, consuming roughly thirty eight acres of densely packed wooden structures in a single afternoon Some 5000 people lost their homes and all their possessions and were marched in shock to detention camps, where they were confined under armed guard for weeks Next to the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, the Chinatown fire is the worst civic disaster in Hawaiian history A dramatic account of people struggling in the face of mounting catastrophe, Plague and Fire is a stimulating and thought provoking read. Heroism Begins with Her bubonic plague the same Black Death that decimated medieval Europe arrived on the shores of Hawaii just as the islands were about to become a U.S territory In this absorbing narrative Buried Mountain Secrets James Mohr tells the story of that fearful visitation and its fiery climax a vast conflagration that engulfed Honolulu s Chinatown Mohr tells this gripping tale largely through the eyes of the people caught up in the disaster Buried Mountain Secrets from members of the white elite to Chinese doctors Buried Mountain Secrets Japanese businessmen The Deranged Cousins, or, Whatever and Hawaiian reporters At the heart of the narrative are three American physicians the Honolulu Board of Health who became virtual dictators when the government granted them absolute control over the armed forces and the treasury The doctors soon quarantined Chinatown Intuición where the plague was killing one or two people a day and clearly spreading They resisted intense pressure from the white community to burn down all of Chinatown at once and instead ordered a careful Street Fight controlled burning of buildings where plague victims had died But a freak wind whipped one of those small fires into a roaring inferno that destroyed everything in its path Windburn (The Elemental Series, consuming roughly thirty eight acres of densely packed wooden structures in a single afternoon Some 5000 people lost their homes and all their possessions and were marched in shock to detention camps Light, Traveling where they were confined under armed guard for weeks Next to the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 Knights vs. Dinosaurs the Chinatown fire is the worst civic disaster in Hawaiian history A dramatic account of people struggling in the face of mounting catastrophe Knights vs. Dinosaurs Plague and Fire is a stimulating and thought provoking read. I read this book because of my interest in the plague and this book did a good job of covering both the plague and the fire that burned down Chinatown in Honolulu Since I dodn t care much for the fire part, I skimmed a lot My biggest problem was the lack of variety in the vocabulary I swear if I see the word Triumvirate again outside of this posting, I m going to scream. Shortly after the Annexation of the Kingdom of Hawaii by a group of mostly American businessmen, bubonic plague broke out in Honolulu President Dole and the Council of State unanimously gave the Board of Health emergency medical powers and in fact, ceded absolute control over the entire Hawaiian archipelago to the Honolulu Board of Health for the duration of the plague crisis Thus, three white American physicians were given absolute dictatorial authority over all off Hawaii To my surprise, Dr Nathanial Emerson, Dr Francis Day, and Dr Clifford Wood did an excellent job during the four months of their absolute rule They knew that plague was caused by bacteria YersinKitasato had identified it six years earlier , but not how the bacteria spread Thus, they were reduced to doing what they could twice daily health inspections of all citizens, careful quarantines, disinfectant, fumigation, and controlled burning of buildings where people had caught plague, wide spread immunization against plague The islands were populated by Chinese, Japanese, American, European and native Hawaiian peoples, but racial tensions though absolutely present were kept to a minimum throughout the crisis As of April 1900, plague cases were no longer reported in the Hawaiian islands. a gripping book to read.I got this from the school library and found it is the only copy that was donated by the university of Georgia as a gift to this library in 2006.A lot of stories are rarely mentioned or even reduced to oblivion but it doesn t mean it never happened The story told in this book fell into this category.This book would be impossible if James C Mohr had not noticed a sigh when he took a walk through the Chinatown during his visit to University of Hawaill the sigh informed him that none of the structures he was looking at were original because all the original building were destroyed around 1900 in a fire This piqued his curiosity and he determined to dig up the hidden story behind it The sign disappeared shortly after he saw it and he said he was always grateful for whoever put the sign up out there in the first place I guess he deemed the sign a fortuitous encounter , or a serendipity to write this book.James C Mohr gave a riveting account of a compelling story of Honolulu s plague and the fire of 1900, but he also stretched the themes to public health,politics and racial relations There may be a tangle of hidden stories and disasters never exposed to spotlight in human history and these disasters could serve as key historical moments when societies reveal their most fundamental truth.This book might have opened up a hidden and fundamental truth by revealing a nearly forgotten catastrophe. Surprisingly relevant book that highlights how medical professionalism and an insistence on scientifically backed evidence can prevent poor decisions based on fear and racism Not that things went perfectly all of Honolulu s Chinatown was accidentally burned to the ground and a lot of people lost everything but, believe it or not, it could have gone a lot worse Political pressures were resisted, and racial tensions that could have easily boiled up into mob violence were mostly quelled Although some resentments remained, at the end of the day, Honolulu survived the plague, whose transmission was still largely a mystery, and provided a template for eradication for about the next ten years.Hawaii s unique political situation, while unfortunate in a lot of ways, might also have been key to its successfully dealing with the plague It could also be argued that this situation is what brought plague here in the first place, but that s a whole other ball of wax The monarchy had been overthrown, and Hawaii s U.S territorial status was being debated in Washington Aside from the obvious reasons to avoid the plague, Honolulu s mostly white business leaders wanted Hawaii to gain status as an internationally important modern western port they didn t want to be lumped in with the rest of Asia, which was currently dealing with its own infestation of plague and had been for years Gaining territorial status would go a long way toward that, and proving that they could handle their own problems like stamping out the plague would go a long way toward proving to the U.S that they would be a problem solving asset, not a plague ridden burden Definitely an interesting piece of Honolulu s history, and a good example of how racial biases not necessarily overt racism, but just ingrained assumptions can affect decision making and how scientific enquiry can help overcome that.