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{Read Pdf} õ The Taste Of War: World War Two And The Battle For Food ó Shows how control of food and its production is crucial to total war Tracing the interaction between food and strategy, on both the military and home fronts, this title demonstrates how the issue of access to food was a driving force within Nazi policy and contributed to the decision to murder hundreds of thousands of useless eaters in Europe Autism and the God Connection: Redefining the Autistic Experience Through Extraordinary Accounts of Spiritual Giftedness on both the military and home fronts La Mina Lisa this title demonstrates how the issue of access to food was a driving force within Nazi policy and contributed to the decision to murder hundreds of thousands of useless eaters in Europe It is really 4 1 2 stars This book is deep y all I have never thought about colonialism and what it did in terms of food access privilege And surprisingly, while I have thought a great deal about food in the American Civil War, I never thought about it in WW II I just assumed that things were industrialized enough to meet the needs of most people In fact, millions and millions starved to deathand food pathways were irrevocably changed for those that were left. I don t feel able to give this book full justice after having read it once.It is, indirectly, a statement of the radical potential of history and the understanding of history the past was different to the present, the present is the creation of the past, the future will be different to the present Change occurs Heritage is the opposite of history a cosy notion of continuity Here Collingham looks at food cultures, indeed when we think about our selves in relation to other people differences I don t feel able to give this book full justice after having read it once.It is, indirectly, a statement of the radical potential of history and the understanding of history the past was different to the present, the present is the creation of the past, the future will be different to the present Change occurs Heritage is the opposite of history a cosy notion of continuity Here Collingham looks at food cultures, indeed when we think about our selves in relation to other people differences in eating habits are dramatically obvious yet in passing we see in this book that such great and impressive cultural differences have the shallowest of roots and indeed can be quickly abandoned or clung to with anxious passion.It is a history of the Second World War from the point of food and nutrition How food and nutrition were drivers of policy and determiners of strategy before, during and to an extent after the war.Looking around the world it is easy to think of food cultures as being the most distinctive markers of different countries, we are who we are because we eat such and such and not the food that they eat over there, yet the author makes clear how far common aspects of our food culture were formed during, or in the decades before WWII such as the spread of Coca Cola, frozen foods, mechanised and technological approaches to agriculture and food processing as well as food dependencies throughout the world This is not just the case for the USA, but also for Japan, both effectively inventing national cuisines view spoiler or in Germany the invention of Quark as a food for human consumption as opposed to a diary waste product hide spoiler in order to both provide adequate nutrition for soldiers andimportantly to please them view spoiler or really to avoid displeasing them with anything too remote from their culinary comfort zones, these new cuisines tended to be bland, or indeed to be strongly inspired by foreign cooking cultures to avoid potentially negative associations view spoiler ie not being like how me Mum cooks that hide spoiler hide spoiler.There is a lot here on the interrelation and intersection of ideology, food networks and policy, the author concentrates on Britain and Empire , Germany, Japan, the Soviet Union and the United Statesthat all sounds terribly highfalutin, as this is also a book about victory gardens, how up to 40 percent of Japanese soldiers in some theatres of war spent their time growing food, or the role of works canteens in providing hot meals even if this required factories growing their own food, particularly in the Soviet Union, in order to keep wartime production up.The contrasts between the countries are striking, with a determination on the part of Germany to effectively plunder occupied countries for food in order to avoid the war weariness of the First World War, Japan s strategic reliance on fighting spirit and a belief that effectively motivated soldiers would fight no matter how malnourished they are, or how the food demands of the USA to supply it s soldiers with meat rich diets providingthan 4000 calories daily caused tensions with all their allies, who when provided with the contrast were less than impressed with their own rations view spoiler anyone for tinned mutton hide spoiler Cultural differences were telling, with Japanese soldiers expected to support themselves in combat zones by boiling wild grasses, the resilience of Ukrainians who had survived the created famine of 1932 33 contrasted with that of Chinese troops who despite coming from a similarly tough background failed to resist inferior numbers of Japanese soldiers But this is also the story of the failure of governments to appreciate the workings of existing food networks and the relative adaptability ofsophisticated to entirely unsophisticated agricultural sectors in different countries So German policy was fixated on occupying and exploiting the Ukraine while Denmark in actuality was a farsignificant source of animal proteins, Belgium provedadaptable than much of Eastern Europe in meeting Germany s food needs and the whole of south east Asia was thrown in to famine by the disruption caused by the Japanese advances in 1941.Really a book that leads you to rethink much that was familiar and the light cast on the fragility of food networks and the impact on wider policy of food dependencies is extremely disturbing, ie these are so extensive and fragile that disruption can cause a disproportionate number of deaths Both in terms of the deep roots of food supply, for example the role of Kenya in supplying the UK with green beans even before WWII but also the exploitation of regions through monocultures to earn cash for desired food stuffs.An impressive book that has a lot to offer I can hardly recommend it strongly enough to the non fiction reader with an interest in the contemporary world and how it was made A unique book that provides a refreshing perspective on the role that the provision and distribution of food played in the Second World WarPerhaps often overlooked, but the reason for Japan and Germany to wage war was in no small part as a result from the conviction that were Japan and Germany to survive as a nation to demand their right being able to supply their population with enough foods In order to survive, Germany needed to create Lebensraum in the East and Japan their version in t A unique book that provides a refreshing perspective on the role that the provision and distribution of food played in the Second World WarPerhaps often overlooked, but the reason for Japan and Germany to wage war was in no small part as a result from the conviction that were Japan and Germany to survive as a nation to demand their right being able to supply their population with enough foods In order to survive, Germany needed to create Lebensraum in the East and Japan their version in the puppet state of Manchukuo, China.Once war was declared, the Allies needed to secure their food as well This was especially important for Great Britain and Russia, who saw their lifelines being cut by the U boat peril and the invasio of their Motherland Great Britain was able to enlarge their local production of wheat and in no small part depended on the United States for the imports of other foodstuffs Russia was able to scrape by, but barely.Germany in the meantime was only able to cover their needs by pillaging the rest of Europe and the so called Hunger Plan in which it deliberately decided to export hunger to the East, to clear the way for the expected German colonisation In Japan, the Emperor s soldiers were expected to fight on an empty stomach.In the end both approached didn t work The paradox is that both Germany and Japan, after the war, were able to reach their goals peacefully anyhow, and the reasons to go to war were not needed anyway Superb Answered many questions Am unable to think that there could possibly be a better book on the subject of Food and WW2.